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Thread: New Guy, Old Back - Squat Form Check

  1. #11
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    • starting strength seminar april 2024
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    Thank you for taking the time!

    Yes, I understand and agree. I use a three inch belt myself at 6'0'' and I prefer it over 4 inch belts. However, for this specific lifter with a glass back, do you not think a 4 inch belt could be worth exploring and experimenting with for the reasons stated above? I think it is a fair recommendation ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  2. #12
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    That is a 4-inch belt.

  3. #13
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    Feb 2021
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    Looked narrow to me, my bad!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddl View Post
    Thank you for taking the time!

    Yes, I understand and agree. I use a three inch belt myself at 6'0'' and I prefer it over 4 inch belts. However, for this specific lifter with a glass back, do you not think a 4 inch belt could be worth exploring and experimenting with for the reasons stated above? I think it is a fair recommendation ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
    I don’t think an inch either way will make a difference to someone with a fragile back. What’s going to screw them up is any loss of focus and tightness in the bottom of the squat. In my experience, a wider belt can actually cause more problems with this by interfering with the lower ribs and hips in the bottom.

  5. #15
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    You guys want to hear something dumb and kinda funny after all this belt talk? This is actually my first time doing linear progression with a belt and shoes. 185 was with chucks and no belt because I listened to people who said things like "belts will keep your core weak". My form was probably also very poor back then because I had yet to discover the blue bible. Can't wait to see how far I can take it with the book, belt, shoes, this forum, and hopefully online coaching once I get into the heavier weights.




    Quote Originally Posted by heinz83 View Post
    First, notice how your chest rises when you take a breath, then it goes down. You are releasing the tension in your upper body, losing your upper back extension, and this is why the bar wants to move forward. Take a giant breath and hold it in, keeping your chest up. Look at the base of the wall, not the floor. As you descend, think about sending your butt backwards. Then you can bend over without falling over.
    Quote Originally Posted by ddl View Post
    These are not horrible but not great.
    You need to widen your stance and shove your knees out so you are able to lean over more. Some reps are too deep, your grip is too wide.
    Copy all that.
    • Keep Tension in Chest
    • Mind Where I'm looking (floor 6ft away per book)
    • Wider Stance
    • more effort into shoving knees out
    • mindful of depth


    I also just did a quick search before asking a question that was probably asked 1000 times, but in terms of the "bounce" - shoving my knees out should help with that by creating tension before I get to parralel? Because if now I'd have to bottom out to get a bounce, and I can't see how bouncing off a rounded back at the very bottom of a squat would ever be a good idea, lol.

    Quote Originally Posted by ddl View Post

    The bar path is fine.

    "Low-bar squats done by a novice with light weights, a masters lifter with light weights, or any male lifter of average size using loads significantly lighter than about 225 will not behave as a heavy work set described in the book – the bar will be a lot to a little forward of the mid-foot because the barbell is not yet significantly heavier than the mass of the body, and we want to warm up the terminal balance position, just like the muscles, joints, and bones." - from the article "Understanding the Master Cue" Understanding the Master Cue | Mark Rippetoe
    This is a wicked useful quote that I guess hadn't stuck in my first couple read-throughs of the book. Thanks for flagging!

    I'll be back at it tomorrow and will post again with an ew attempt before too long.

    Thanks so much for taking the time!
    Nic

  6. #16
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    Feb 2021
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    Quote Originally Posted by lolnickybobby View Post
    I also just did a quick search before asking a question that was probably asked 1000 times, but in terms of the "bounce" - shoving my knees out should help with that by creating tension before I get to parralel?
    The short answer is yes. A wider stance with more knees out means the adductors, your groin muscles, are being worked through a longer range of motion. To balance the work done by your adductors, your abductors, the glutes, have to work harder too. The use of more muscle mass, in a "tighter" position will improve the bounce. Basically.

    Too wide of stance though will have your adductors reach the end of their range of motion before you hit parallel which means you will squat high, or your knees will cave in.

  7. #17
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    Aug 2023
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    Hey guys... update on the 4" vs. 3" belt discussion.

    When deadlifting in particular, my belt always felt like it was in the way, either of my hip bone or my rib cage, given I'm 5'9 1/2" and don't have much space between them.

    Last Monday one of my ribs somehow popped out (or onto) the belt as I was deadlifting, and it's been hurting ever since. Took a week off, got back into it today and could do my squats and presses just fine, but couldn't even get through a 135 warmup set on deadlift.

    Guess DLs are out until I heal up, and I'll be shopping for a 3" belt...

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