Bench Press Elbow Movement After Rebound Bench Press Elbow Movement After Rebound

starting strength gym
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Bench Press Elbow Movement After Rebound

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Posts
    99

    Default Bench Press Elbow Movement After Rebound

    • starting strength seminar december 2023
    • starting strength seminar february 2024
    • starting strength seminar april 2024
    Male 6'4", 230 pounds, 43 years old. Injured my left arm and deloaded considerably and did a linear progression on the press and bench and things feel a lot better now towards the tail end of that. Noticed a slight bit of backward elbow movement after the rebound in the bench press. I know in the squat that you do not want your knee moving around at and after the rebound. Is this a similar problem in the bench press? I did also record straight on and my elbow doesn't flare out away from my body, but comes back a slight bit towards my shoulder not taking the same path in the descent. Just want to check is this is a problem or if there are any other problems I should be aware of. Thank you.

    IMG 9388 - YouTube

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    52,806

    Default

    Your grip is a little too wide, and you may be hitting the chest too high/toward your chin. Narrow it one finger and try it again. I see nothing horrible here.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    361

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Your grip is a little too wide, and you may be hitting the chest too high/toward your chin. Narrow it one finger and try it again. I see nothing horrible here.
    Rip, Iím hesitant to say this, but Iím seeing his elbows about 2 inches forward of the bar, creating a pretty big moment arm. No?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    52,806

    Default

    I can't tell from this angle.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2021
    Posts
    395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Kalin View Post
    Rip, I’m hesitant to say this, but I’m seeing his elbows about 2 inches forward of the bar, creating a pretty big moment arm. No?
    If I'm not mistaken, the moment arm of interest is determined by position of the bar in relation to the shoulder, not the elbow, right?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    361

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Donaldson View Post
    If I'm not mistaken, the moment arm of interest is determined by position of the bar in relation to the shoulder, not the elbow, right?
    Well that’s the inevitable moment arm. Set up for a bench press with a moderate amount of weight and try it both ways. Elbows under the bar, and elbows 3-4 inches in front of the bar.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2023
    Posts
    248

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Kalin View Post
    Well that’s the inevitable moment arm. Set up for a bench press with a moderate amount of weight and try it both ways. Elbows under the bar, and elbows 3-4 inches in front of the bar.
    A moment arm is developed when the load is displaced from the upward force, which depending on the lift may or may not correspond to a specific anatomical structure. In the bench press, the upward force actually moves throughout the progress of the lift, going from the lower part of the sternum at the bottom, to nearly directly above the shoulders at the top. There is no "inevitable moment arm", only a displacement of the joint away from the upward force, which similarly changes throughout the progress of the lift both as the force changes and as the arms approach extension (reducing the cross section of the lever system of the arm).

    The position of the elbows relative to the pressing direction is a matter of anthropometry (a lifter with long arms might need to start the elbows several inches in front of the bar, and they might not reach directly under the bar until near lockout). This is compensated by them having a proportionally longer segment of the arm *behind* the bar.

    However, I see what you mean: it seems like he might not be fully extending his shoulders at the top of the lockout. If this is the case, it is likely compounded by the excessively wide grip: too wide a grip prevents the deltoids from pulling the arms "forward" (that is, up) because of the disadvantageous position this putes them in

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    361

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Maybach View Post
    A moment arm is developed when the load is displaced from the upward force, which depending on the lift may or may not correspond to a specific anatomical structure. In the bench press, the upward force actually moves throughout the progress of the lift, going from the lower part of the sternum at the bottom, to nearly directly above the shoulders at the top. There is no "inevitable moment arm", only a displacement of the joint away from the upward force, which similarly changes throughout the progress of the lift both as the force changes and as the arms approach extension (reducing the cross section of the lever system of the arm).

    The position of the elbows relative to the pressing direction is a matter of anthropometry (a lifter with long arms might need to start the elbows several inches in front of the bar, and they might not reach directly under the bar until near lockout). This is compensated by them having a proportionally longer segment of the arm *behind* the bar.

    However, I see what you mean: it seems like he might not be fully extending his shoulders at the top of the lockout. If this is the case, it is likely compounded by the excessively wide grip: too wide a grip prevents the deltoids from pulling the arms "forward" (that is, up) because of the disadvantageous position this putes them in
    Canít a lifter with longer arms compensate for this by simply touching the chest a bit lower down?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    52,806

    Default

    What does that do to the moment arm between the bar and the shoulder?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    361

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    What does that do to the moment arm between the bar and the shoulder?
    Maybe Iím wording this wrong. Or maybe Iím just wrong😁. It seems to me that energy is wasted by not having the forearms vertical, in both axisís, at the bottom. No?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •