Starting Strength Weekly Report


July 15, 2019


Announcements
  • Starting Strength is now available in audiobook! Get your copy today on Audible, Amazon, or iTunes
Starting Strength Radio
Starting Strength Channel


Articles
  • A Recipe for Survival – Ryan Blom was strong when he got the bad news - a broken back and stage IV cancer. He's still fighting back against it now.
  • From the Archives: In Physical Function and Aging, Mary Conover explains how strength training pushes back against weakness, dependence, and chronic disease.
Training Log

In the Trenches

kyoungha kim adjusts the bar position for the squat
Kyoungha Kim adjusts the bar position for a lifter at the Starting Strength Training Camp held in Seoul this past weekend. [photo courtesy of Inhyuk Eun]
lifters at seoul
Group photo of the lifters and coaches at the Seoul Starting Strength Training Camp. [photo courtesy of Kyoungha Kim]
bertug locks out a deadlift
Bertug locks out 190 kg for his final set of five. He came all the way from Cyprus to London to attend the training camp at Red Sun CrossFit [photo courtesy of Pete Troupos]
uk camps group photos
Some amazing people came from all over Europe to improve their squat and deadlift at three sold-out Starting Strength training camps in London at Red Sun Crossfit. [photo courtesy of Pete Troupos]


Best of the Week

Standing Vertical Jump
agingstrong

The standing vertical jump which you often refer to as a measure of an athlete’s inherent physical ability. Much like the IQ of a person this value cannot be significantly increased but is basically the inherent physical prowess of that individual.

However, a male being tested at the age of 18 is going to have a significantly higher standing vertical jump then he will at 68. Even a superior athlete with the vertical jump of 30+ inches at the age of 18 is going to have a horrible vertical jump value at the age of 68, yet he is the same person.

So my questions are:

  1. At what age range are standing vertical jump numbers valid?
  2. Are there any curves showing the degradation of the standing vertical jump with age?
  3. What test can be used to determine the inherent athletic ability of a 68 year-old old?
  4. Does the reaction time of an individual mean anything to inherent strength ability?
Mark Rippetoe

1. At what age range are standing vertical jump numbers valid? They are assumed to be valid for people in their early 20s.

2. Are there any curves showing the degradation of the standing vertical jump with age? Not that I know of. And who cares anyway? You know what the curve will look like. Feel free to draw your own.

3. What test can be used to determine the inherent athletic ability of a 68 year-old old? Why is this important to a 68-year-old? Vanity? Do you have an NFL Combine to attend? You know that your athletic ability has degraded from where it was in your 20s. And I can't think of a better way to need surgery than to start trying to assess an irrelevant parameter that involves loading the now-inelastic connective tissues that might be semi-successfully holding your ass together.

4. Does the reaction time of an individual mean anything to inherent strength ability? Not that I've ever been able to tell. I have very fast hands and a very shitty SVJ. Always have.

Suwannee Dave

Good God man. Who the fuck cares about a SVJ for a 68 year old? This reminds me of an article I read about an older guy who started trying to compete in Masters cycling events. He quickly learned that the winners were on "Testosterone Replacement Therapy", in other words they were juicing. As Trump would say, "Sad"

Philipp Muhoray

Rip, if my 102 year old grandma has a vertical jump of 2 inches, do you think she will be able to compete in the USAPL?


Best of the Forum

Lift heavy things for healthy back
Jay Mund

Not terrible: The Best Way to Avoid Back Pain? Lift Heavy Things

Mark Rippetoe

They can't bring themselves to type the word "deadlift," the poor little things.

BenBoskovski

I think what they mean by heavy things is a kettlebell deadlift and the various other submaximal forms of posterior chain work (one legged dumbell goodmornings, deadlift with bands)

Mark Rippetoe

Yep. They cannot grasp the concept of Training.

Pluripotent

Ironically, these things are more likely to hurt your back than a heavy deadlift properly executed.

KangaJoo

"Right, because making regular lifting a part of your everyday routine means grabbing an olympic bar with 315lbs and pumping that up for reps.

That's exactly a fast express trip to fucking up your back catastrophically if you don't have 100% proper form."

What an amazing comment. Should go tell all the people at my gym deadlifting with only decent form that they better stop trying before their backs explode due to not having 100% proper form.

Pluripotent

An amazing number of people have less than perfect deadlift form, probably most of those who deadlift. And yet - while I would not recommend it - even with poor form, back injuries from the deadlift are not common. I went to school with someone who posted a new PR deadlift on facebook which he was pretty proud of. The form was atrocious and cringe worthy with an exaggerated cat back and several desperate hitches off the knees to get to lockout, all the while surrounded by people from his gym cheering him on. I would never condone such a lift and if he asked me (which he didn't), I'd tell him to never do that again and drop weights until he can achieve better form. And yet his back is fine, as far as I know.

Jay Mund

Yeah, "not terrible" really only applies to the title of the "article." Not sure what they mean by "heavy lifting" when the majority of the time the writers are talking about competitive rowers doing endurance work. I guess I was overwhelmed by the fact that they were acknowledging that not all municipal workers need to wear a girdle all day long and avoid lifting anything over 25 lbs to avoid back injury. They have succeeded in lowering my expectations so far that this "article" is a breath of fresh air. Sad.

Mark Rippetoe

If this guy continues to walk around, the deadlift is not dangerous: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtO5VSW7Bvk

JFord

When I started SS at age 57 I was scared of deadlifting because I've had low back pain since I was a teenager. I trained with SSC Paul Horn. He walked me through it and encouraged me. I believe my form is fair to good but undoubtedly far from perfect. I later did the seminar. It took me a while to understand the mechanics from reading the book but eventually I made peace with it. It did not make my back pain better but it in no way has made it worse. Paul's response when I told him that was "You can have back pain and be weak or you can have back pain and be strong. Which do you prefer?" Easy choice.

The only time I had a problem was once when I accidentally let out my valsalva during descent. It felt like my low back exploded. I apparently proved that valsalva (even when putting the bar down) matters! I've never made that mistake again. No other inadequacy in my technique has ever exacerbated my pain.





Starting Strength Weekly Report

Highlights from the StartingStrength Community. Browse archives.