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Q&A Episode - They Really Don’t Know Anything | Starting Strength Radio #62

Mark Rippetoe | June 26, 2020

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Mark Rippetoe:
Here's a pornography reference...Uh...About my memoirs from my decades in the porn industry. We've...Rather, forget all of that.

Mark Wulfe:
From The Aasgaard Company studios in beautiful Wichita Falls, Texas... From the finest mind in the modern fitness industry... The One True Voice in the strength and conditioning profession... The most important podcast on the internet.... Ladies and gentlemen! Starting Strength Radio.

Mark Rippetoe:
Welcome back to Starting Strength Radio. It's Friday, which means it's not the square root of two thousand nine hundred fourteen point eight.

Mark Rippetoe:
And here we are with our cup of doo doo. And our Comments from the Haters!

Mark Rippetoe:
And I know a lot of you just...this is the only reason you're here. You listen to these and then turn the whole damn thing off. And I don't blame you because this is some funny shit. There's no doubt about it.

Mark Rippetoe:
"You are what you eat. This explains why Rip is so pink."

Mark Rippetoe:
Would you care to speculate on... Well.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. "At least we were spared from having to see Rip wear the crop top." This is when I helped Bre with her wardrobe a couple weeks ago. You running out of clothes or I had to chop a shirt off for her.

Mark Rippetoe:
She's got one of those on right now, doesn't she? You got a normal shirt on now. Tucked in! She's got a tucked in shirt on just like Rippy. She's making fun of me is what she's doing. I know what she's doing. She's got her little statement. You know.

[off-camera]:
Wear a wife-beater and tuck it in right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Tuck it in. I was at a power lifting meet a long time ago... Gym owner in Austin showed up - had a gym down there -showed up in a pair of dress slacks and dress shoes and a tank top, tucked in. It's quite the touch. It just was amazing. Back in the 80s

[off-camera]:
You could do that.

Mark Rippetoe:
We sure had a lot of fun back then. You know, Austin was fun. Still fun, wasn't insane like it is now. There wasn't a loyalty oath before you could go into town like there is now. Oh shit.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. "This pandemic is so dangerous, I don't understand how Rip is still alive. I mean, a hundred thousand people are dead. How is the fat old pink man not one of them?"

Mark Rippetoe:
Yeah, you'll have to ask yourself that. Won't you? Oh shit.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Well, as the saying goes, I'm no proctologist, but I know an asshole when I see one."

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, this was in reference to...oh me and Koumalotsus talking about you know, the government fucking us up. You know. I'd rather have Koumalotsus on my side than you, bottom one percenter.

Mark Rippetoe:
And of course: "Come on, Rip, if you're going to broadcast your views at least do your due diligence. Seeds sales weren't banned in Michigan and this was established months ago." Rusty?

[off-camera]:
Forbes said the exact opposite. They're pretty reputable, right?

Mark Rippetoe:
I'd think, you know, of course, they're right wing. So, yeah.

[off-camera]:
But yeah, they said, let's see. "Michigan bans many stores from selling seeds, gardening supplies and calls them," quote unquote, "not necessary."

Mark Rippetoe:
Yes. Yes, we we knew that, neogoin or whatever your fucking name is here. We knew that. That's why I said it. Because we knew it was true. And that's why I said it. And your telling me it's not true is bullshit. Ok.

Mark Rippetoe:
"You're carrying a large grudge and throwing around my misogynistic insults over something that isn't even true."

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, how is anything I have said construed as misogynistic? Hold it. What does that even mean? It's where you don't like women.

[off-camera]:
That's right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Right. Isn't that directly contradicted by the first comment from the hater that we talked about earlier?

[off-camera]:
I believe you called that governor a MILF.

Mark Rippetoe:
I did call her a MILF. That lets liking that. Right. I mean, as being charitable. But but I did say she was a MILF. Oh, God.

Mark Rippetoe:
So anyway, is the. Anyway, he said to see the channel being used to "parrot debunked right wing talking points."

Mark Rippetoe:
No. My friend, we invent debunked right wing talking points. We don't parrot them. We're above the parroting. All right. We create our own.

Mark Rippetoe:
And that's Comments from the Haters!

Mark Rippetoe:
Ok. And now since we got comments from the haters, you already know, we're doing Q&A today, don't you? We're doing Q&A, so let's just jump right in, shall we?

Mark Rippetoe:
"Hey, Mark, you're a smart guy with a bigger audience than I. How do I know the Corona virus causes illness? With words like asymptomatic carrier and with no meaningful difference in death outcomes between strict confinement countries like Spain and no confinement countries like Sweden? And given how to date, no study actually confirms this fact, that I'm aware of, I struggle to see how coronavirus is actually the key factor in the production of illness. Am I missing something? In my mind if coronavirus was actually a contagious disease, you would see a case difference between confinement and no confinement. In my mind, if Corona virus causes illness, it means that people get sick when exposed. But with more than 50 percent of infected being asymptomatic carriers seems likely to me that something else is the problem. But people look at me like I'm an idiot when I explain to them that the mainstream news clearly indicates a coronavirus isn't contagious and doesn't cause illness."

Mark Rippetoe:
Well, Jamie those are interesting questions. Very interesting questions.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. Now... "Part of the silver lining of the last 90 days has been coming across Starting Strength, ordering the blue and gray books and committing to getting stronger. I notice that you mentioned the Deadwood series a few times over the course of the podcast, but not the movie. Wonder if you enjoyed it and how it ranks against your love for some of the best television ever created. For what it's worth, it's shot a few miles from my house and I worked in a few the scenes. I would say, look for the long haired, heavy bearded guy, but that doesn't really narrow it down in Deadwood."

Mark Rippetoe:
No, no, it doesn't. All of the extras were long haired, heavy bearded guys.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Best to you and the rest of the Starting Strength." All right. I saw the movie and enjoyed the movie, I just liked seeing everybody again. I enjoyed the series so much. The problem with a three season series is that, there's just so much character development, so many things that went on, so many things were elaborated. You can't really put a period on the end of the sentence in a two hour movie.

Mark Rippetoe:
And I think that most of the people that saw it came away with that kind of that kind of feeling. I was just glad to get to see the characters again. And, you know, you that that series was so... It was just a masterpiece in terms of character development. And you got to know these people and it was just a just an amazing exposure to the creative mind of the people to put that series together. David Milch, especially the guy's, just a fucking genius.

Mark Rippetoe:
And I'd have to say I enjoyed the movie, but, you know, it just kind of left you with a "is that all there is to it?" But really, there wasn't any other way you could've done it. You know, so if you're a big fan of the series, certainly watch the film, certainly watch the movie, it was on HBO. It's still available on HBO. And I mean, until they get it taken down, you ought to watch it. It's just a you know, it's a good to see, good to see the folks who did Deadwood again.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, a little more serious. Now a little training question or two or three... I think there's a bunch of injury stuff in here today too. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Hello, Rip." He's from India. Coming to the question: "We now clearly know that full range motion lifts are better for strength than hypertrophy, but some coaches are presenting a case for quarter squats, saying it's better for jumping/sprinting due to the similar joint angles involved."

Mark Rippetoe:
We're still not past that. We can't get past the the similarity between strength training and what you're going to use the strength for in the sport. We... Just the ability to think through this, it's just... It's Just a daunting task for some people.

Mark Rippetoe:
"So are quarter squats really beneficial for this purpose? Are we better off getting generally strong, training explosiveness using the Olympic power movements?"

Mark Rippetoe:
All right, look. Why do we squat? Why do we squat for a sprinter? Why do we squat? Do we squat to practice our sprints? Why, no? We sprint to practice our sprint. We work on our running mechanics when we're sprinting, right?

Mark Rippetoe:
Why would we try to make our squats look like our sport movement pattern when our sport movement pattern is not a squat? Why would we do that? The only reason we would do that is because we're stupid, we're stupid, stupid people think like this.

Mark Rippetoe:
Why do you squat? To get stronger. So if we're squatting to get stronger, how do we squat? To get the strongest. How do we use the squat? For the most effective exposure to a strength training stress in the gym. And that's a full range of motion squat.

Mark Rippetoe:
Quarter squats don't make you as strong as squats. So don't do quarter squats. And now you're stronger. You've got your squat from 225 up to 505. And during that whole period of time of going up 300 pounds or so on your squat, you were sprinting. And guess what? You're stronger. Legs and hips have been taught to sprint as the strength developed.

Mark Rippetoe:
I... You know, the only reason I address this, because we've talked about this for 15 years, is because it's been a while since it came up. And I just want to remind you, why do we squat? Why do we squat? We squat to get stronger. We sprint to get sprintier. We squat to get stronger.

Mark Rippetoe:
"What exercises do you recommend to strengthen a shoulder with three irreparable tears - supraspinatus, infraspinatus and subscapularis?"

Mark Rippetoe:
I recommend the press because it works everything that's left to work. If you have three irreparable tears, you can't train them anyway. I've got most of the muscle mass torn away from my right shoulder blade, my posterior right shoulder blade's got a hollow spot in it from a rupture of the infraspinatus and probably the teres minor.

Mark Rippetoe:
And I press, You know. I think you ought a bench press too. Press and bench press. There are no particular exercises that suddenly become applicable in the event of an injury. You find the weight you can press, do that weight and then go up a little bit next time. Just like you always did. OK.

Mark Rippetoe:
"I am 72. I deadlifted regularly." Not me, the guy that wrote the letter. "I deadlifted regularly for five years and contracted an inguinal hernia. Hernia of the groin area in 2018. My associates tell me that it is easy to develop this injury doing deadlifts. I miss deadlifts, but I sure don't miss the injury. Why do some deadlifters get hernias while others don't?"

Mark Rippetoe:
And here's another hernia question. Hernia questions get asked a lot. You know, we've dealt with them on the board seven or eight hundred thousand times. But... So we'll just talk about it, OK?

Mark Rippetoe:
"I have a friend who had a mesh repair of a hernia 12 to 15 years ago. I've worked with him on his squat, however, he is very reluctant to do anything resembling a deadlift. The mesh repair is the go to response for avoiding deadlifts when I bring it up. I've said time and again that considering how active he is and has been, he hasn't messed it up by now, it's not likely to happen at all. I've also told him that if he makes normal, sensible progression on deadlifts, there's no way at this point something terrible is going to happen with the repair. What else can I say to him to change his mind? Anything?"

Mark Rippetoe:
All right, let's just do the basic hernia lecture. All right. You do not get hernias from deadlifts, even at the age of 70. You get hernias from your parents. You inherit a defect in the inguinal canal and it eventually goes. You're fortunate to have gone that long until you're 70, before you had before you had a hernia.

Mark Rippetoe:
But you didn't get a hernia from deadlifting. You already had a weak inguinal ring and it finally gave out. I had a hernia surgery back in 2004. All right. I had been lifting for obviously decades before that, and I injured my hernia... The first time I remember feeling it was on a split snatch or split jerk.

Mark Rippetoe:
I was doing a split. I slammed into the split. I felt something. It irritated me for two, three weeks, then went away and then I finally messed it up real good climbing a pegboard that I used to have in the gym. So it was it was hard abdominal contraction that last time that jerked it open. And then it was getting worse. I finally had to have it fixed.

Mark Rippetoe:
So I go in and have they have a bilateral mesh repair, a bilateral mesh repair. Don't let them fix one side when the other side is just right there. And if you've got a weakness on one side, why not fix the other one at the same time?

Mark Rippetoe:
And with a mesh repair, what generally happens is they go in there and they lay the mesh down and cover the floor of the abdominal cavity with it. And they anchor it with some little plastic anchors. All right. And that those plastic anchors hold the mesh in place while it's incorporating into the tissue of the floor of the abdominal cavity. OK.

Mark Rippetoe:
And as it was explained to me, the mesh is actually incorporated into that tissue in about 72 hours, meaning that were they to try to go in and pull it out, they couldn't do it. It just grows in and becomes part of the floor of the abdominal cavity. And once that takes place, oh, you're going to feel some things moving around and you're going to have some pain for five or six months as you rehab the thing from time to time. It'll hurt a little bit as it settles into place. But in the 16 years that that have elapsed since I had mine, I have not had a minute's trouble with it at all.

Mark Rippetoe:
I've heard of people having trouble with it. I've heard of mesh correction operations taking place. But I think that the vast majority of people that have this bilateral hernia repair have no trouble with it whatsoever.

Mark Rippetoe:
And it's... It's unclear from the first guy, Victor here, who says that he's 72. And he..it doesn't say he had a repair done. If you haven't had the repair done, go ahead and get it over with. Have the bilateral repair. It's not that big a deal. They go in, they use a scope now on this.

Mark Rippetoe:
And you're 72, I'm assuming you'd like to continue to be physically active. You're going to be down two or three weeks from this surgery and then you'll be back to training.

Mark Rippetoe:
The reason some deadlifters get hernias while others don't, is because some deadlifters have hernias already and some of them don't. And that's all there is to it.

Mark Rippetoe:
The deadlift does not cause hernias. All right. At your associates are wrong. You've heard of that happening. Being wrong. Right. Even if they're doctors.

Mark Rippetoe:
And [if] you're the guy with the mesh repair 12-15 years ago. This guy had a mesh repair, 12 to 15 years ago. So same as me. It'd be like me saying, "I don't want to deadlift because 15 years ago, I had a little surgical procedure that I can still lean on as an excuse to not deadlift."

Mark Rippetoe:
What are you gonna say to him to change his mind? Nothing. You don't want to deadlift. He doesn't have to deadlift if he doesn't want to deadlift. He squats. He's not smart enough to understand that if he's squats, he can deadlift? He just doesn't like the deadlift. Leave him alone, man.

Mark Rippetoe:
Leave him alone. You can't make him be smarter than he is. You know, you can't grow any balls on the guy. I mean, you can't do it. I just doesn't happen, right?

Mark Rippetoe:
If I were you, I'd just, you know, just quit training with the guy. Just drink beer with him. He can probably do that.

Mark Rippetoe:
"First, thank you for all you do. I had open heart surgery November 15th, 20__. My wife purchased a squat rack for my birthday. He's 5'4" 150, Forty four years old.

Mark Rippetoe:
Little guy. Little bitty dude.

Mark Rippetoe:
You think that's "her"? "My wife purchased a squat rack for my birthday. I'm 5'4" 150."

Mark Rippetoe:
Why is she still married to the guy? Little bitty guy like that love due to his wife.

[off-camera]:
She thinks he's the biggest, strongest.

Mark Rippetoe:
Do you think? Could be. Giving the... Yeah, and he might be like, you know [mimes "hung"] right? That happens occasionally with little dudes. Right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Ok. Bench is at 100. Press is 75, squats at 100, deadlifts at 120.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Should I stay at those weights or should increase the weight slowly?"

Mark Rippetoe:
Well. Jamie, why would you anticipate me telling you to stay at those weights? Is this really a question? You think I'm not going to tell you to take your squat to 105 and your deadlift to 125 and maybe make your press go up to 77 and your bench to 102.5. You think I won't say that to you?

Mark Rippetoe:
Have you ever watched this podcast before? Have you read our books? Do you not know anything at all? All I know is you better hang onto your wife because she's looking at bigger guys.

Mark Rippetoe:
Unless you're like [mimes "hung"]. Maybe you are. I don't know. Don't send me a picture. Send that picture to Bre. OK?

Mark Rippetoe:
She's not bothered by that at all. She said fine. All right. Well, send it to her.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. "Mark, I've noticed that one of my tendons rolls over the head of my fibula at the bottom of a squat. No pain associated with this issue, but I find it unsettling. I've searched the squat Starting Strength forum found this question has been asked before to which your response was, "Have you read the book?"

Mark Rippetoe:
That's usually my response because it's all been dealt with in the book. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Appears this problem occurs just before parallel which chops off my squat." Only because you let it chop off your squat. "I can resolve this issue by using a wider stance or pointing my toes to a more forward position." I was going to say, point your toes to a more outward position. "These remedies obviously deviate from proper technique. I will admit that I have not had my form evaluated by coach."

Mark Rippetoe:
Here's the this is what I would do: I would have my form evaluated by coach and I would probably, if that didn't fix it, I would put a wrap on that knee. I'd put a wrap on just that knee. It doesn't take much compression to make that tendon settle down and be stable.

Mark Rippetoe:
I understand it's distracting. I've never had it, but I've trained several people that have had that. I've had one guy one time that would do squat and you could hear the tendon rub in over the top of the fibula. It was more sickening to me than it was to him. But we fixed it with a wrap.

Mark Rippetoe:
Just put wrap a on. Just hold it in place. You don't need it tight enough to be supportive. You just need it tight enough to put a little compression on that tendon so that it behaves itself at the bottom of the squat. But probably you'd need your form looked at. Probably.

Mark Rippetoe:
Here's a here's a little secret. Here's a little secret. A lot of times when you have pops in a shoulder or an elbow or knee. It has been my experience that you can actually make it stop by thinking about tightening it. "I heard my shoulder pop. All right, this time I'm just going to squeeze that thing and keep it still." And you can. It's just something you might want to try.

Mark Rippetoe:
But I think you need your form evaluated. And I think you'll find that probably the thing goes away when you get stance and toe angle and knee position with respect to the toes all ironed out, OK?

Mark Rippetoe:
"Rip." he says. Spelled correctly with one P. "I'm six weeks inno Novice LP sets of five, adding five pounds a session, progressing just like you say. I've doubled my squat. Excellent progress on the other lifts to. Eating well, sleeping well, gaining weight. Before this, I spent years working hard, doing lots of crap in the gym, and I've made more progress in these last six weeks than the previous two years. So I'm pleased."

Mark Rippetoe:
And we hear this all the time, don't we, boys and girls? Yes, we do.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Due to personal scheduling, I can no longer keep the same timetable. The only way I can do the same volume each week it to have six shorter sessions on six days. One day off, instead of this ideal three longer sessions. How will this affect progress? What can I do to maintain progress?" He's in his middle 40s, 5'11" 165. Still needs to gain a bunch of weight.

Mark Rippetoe:
You're in your 40s. You're 5'11" 165. You need to gain a bunch of weight. Five eleven, mid 40s, man, ought to weigh 200 pounds and, you know, you just should, right?

Mark Rippetoe:
200lbs. Rusty is not 5'11", he doesn't weigh 200 pounds. Well, what do you weigh?

Mark Rippetoe:
One eighty seven and you are five seven, five six. Nick weighs 200 pounds.

[off-camera]:
Two oh five actually.

Mark Rippetoe:
two oh five. He weighs 205. Bre, you weigh 205, don't you? You're 205. You're five seven 205. Grown man. I'm five eight too. I'm 205

[off-camera]:
215

Mark Rippetoe:
215. Yeah. I've goten a little... Put on a little mass recently.

[off-camera]:
Cultivating mass.

Mark Rippetoe:
I'm getting all bulked up. I'm on a bulk phase. I'm doing a bulk. People do cuts. Nobody ever does a bulk. Do they? Is that term gone?

[off-camera]:
Cuts are the bane of my existence as a coach.

[off-camera]:
Every twenty five year old kid is doing a cut.

Mark Rippetoe:
They're doing bulks too?

[off-camera]:
They're usually cutting.

Mark Rippetoe:
Yeah, they're they're cutting more than they're bulking. As is obvious when you see the little nasty little pasty white skinny fraternity looking fucks.

[off-camera]:
Or if you're the client Drew, you just cut all the time.

Mark Rippetoe:
Cut all the time. Well, we're going to need to have a word with him, though.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. Here to our first observation about this guy is that he needs to eat more. And as far as the timetable goes, if you want to go to a six day on/one day off schedule, that's and that's what you have to do, then why are you asking me? If that's what you have to do, then that's what you have to do.

Mark Rippetoe:
It's not optimal because it's better to have a complete day of rest between the stress events. It aids in recovery. But if you can't do it any other way, then you can't do it any other way. And you have to do what you can do. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
We know what optimal is and you know what optimal is, we've already told you what optimal is.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right, here's another one. This is similar. "As my weights go up in the LP it takes longer and longer for me to do the workout." That's true. "As a result, I'm either pressed for time in the mornings before work or pressed for time to manage my familial affairs in the evening. What are your thoughts on dividing the L.P workout into bench press in the morning and a squat deadlift in the evening or some variation thereof?"

Mark Rippetoe:
You do what you have to do. You, you know, not the best. What the best is what we've already written in the books. You know what the best is, but if you can't do it, you can't do it. So just do what you can do. At least you're still training. Right.

Mark Rippetoe:
OK. "Hey, Rip. Excellent video on boxing squats, I am also in my 60s and using them because of creaky knees. Are you doing anything else prior to your squats to help warm them up a bit?"

Mark Rippetoe:
No, I'm not. I just do a few couple sets of just bodyweight down to the box and do the empty bar for a couple of doubles or triples. Then I go 135 for... I might do three doubles at 135. Put my belt on for the last one. Go to two and a quarter. And do a single maybe a double, maybe two singles at two and a quarter, then go to 275 to a single and then whatever work sets I'm going to do, I'll do those.

Mark Rippetoe:
I have found that as I have gotten older, I just can't do a whole bunch of squatting and get recovered. I fucked around two, three weeks ago and did a couple sets across on the rack pull - a couple sets of two sets of five across, and that's from God, that's been probably four weeks ago and my back is still irritated. I irritated my SI joint and it's.

Mark Rippetoe:
You just... I'm telling you, as you get older, you really need to figure out the minimum effective dose of this shit and do no more than that. All right. I know it's popular to try to find the maximum tolerable dose, but you can get away with that shit in your 30s, in your 60s you can't do it.

Mark Rippetoe:
You can't get recovered from it and you tweak something, it's going to take a long enough time to heal up, that it's going to interfere with your training. Do the least you can get away with, the minimum effective dose.

Mark Rippetoe:
It's a common term in medicine. And we've used it here at length. I've written an article about it rather recently. I want you to think about how little you can get away with doing, not with how much you can stand. All right. It's it's a it's not useful to think like that when you're a person of age.

Mark Rippetoe:
Nobody said anything. I just coined a new term. A person of age. I just right now thought that.

[off-camera]:
That's not a new term.

Mark Rippetoe:
It's not?

[off-camera]:
No. A person of age?

Mark Rippetoe:
A person of...POA. That's not a new term?

[off-camera]:
That's not a new term.

Mark Rippetoe:
A POC person of color. That's a that's a perfectly acceptable term. I haven't heard a...I had heard of a POA during this entire chaotic four months we've gone through.

Mark Rippetoe:
You know, what about a person of age? Do we have rights and and privileges not accorded to little turds like you and you and you?

[off-camera]:
Not if you're white.

Mark Rippetoe:
Not if you're white, you don't. You're just an old white man.

[off-camera]:
I'm not an old white man.

Mark Rippetoe:
Subject to being pushed around, you know.

Mark Rippetoe:
That's how you get shot. You fuck with old white men. We're not going to fight with you. We'll just paralyze you by shooting you in the spine. We'll paralyze your ass. We're not... I'm not concerned with fighting with you. I'm just concerned with getting the fuck out of there in one piece. And you may be the worse for wear. Okay.

Mark Rippetoe:
Let's see. You think that's dandruff or just sunburn flaking off?

[off-camera]:
I dont' think there's enough hair for dandruff.

Mark Rippetoe:
No, I think you have to have hair to have dandruff, don't you.

[off-camera]:
It's just skin.

Mark Rippetoe:
Just skin. Whatever they call it at this point.

[off-camera]:
Whatever that phase is. That's called "summer" for me. Chunks of scalp falling off.

Mark Rippetoe:
Yep. Well, you know, go outside and mow the yard without a hat on. And the reason I do that is so I can make the skin on my head the same colors as the pink [points to forearm]

[off-camera]:
It's working really well.

Mark Rippetoe:
It is? [tilts head down] Look, is it white or ?

[off-camera]:
Same pink.

Mark Rippetoe:
Beautiful. Well, the... That's the idea.

Mark Rippetoe:
Ok. Right.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. "So, as it turns out...." All right. "I tried to think of something to write to be funny, totally hopefully..." Pshhh! "I don't do biceps curls and I want to add grip strength training. My goal is to crush a matured coconut in each hand simultaneously and not have and not to have a bitch grip when deadlifting, but mostly crushing nuts. Would..." He's right about the English not being the first language. "Would adding a grip strength training routine at the end of exercise A and B, hinder my novice linear progression in any way or slow down progress when entering intermediate progression?"

Mark Rippetoe:
Well, yes. As it turns out, if you're deadlift goes from two and a quarter to 405, your grip got stronger too. Now. If you tried to do a whole bunch of grip training stuff, you know, the kind that Iron Mind sells and all these gimmicky bullshit things that they've got for grippers and all this other shit.

Mark Rippetoe:
You don't need grippers, you need a heavier deadlift. You need five pounds more on the deadlift because what holds onto that the deadlift is your grip. All right. You need to do a double overhand grip all the way up to your last warm up and make sure you can double overhand grip up to your last warm up and then would do whatever you need to do, either hook or alternate or in some cases strap your work set.

Mark Rippetoe:
But if the last warm up set goes up in weight, then your grip strength is going up to. Right. Now, let's say you get all industrious and buy a bunch of shit from these people in California and you start squeezing on things and you start doing a bunch of heavy barbell curls. Guess what happens to your ability to go up five pounds on the deadlift and still hang onto the bar?

Mark Rippetoe:
I made a serious mistake, but in preparing for a meet one time by doing this very thing. And I'd never had grip problems, I never had any problem holding on to PR deadlifts ever. I'd pulled 633 in two different meets weighing 220. Never had any problems.

Mark Rippetoe:
This one time for some bizarre reason, decided to do a whole bunch of curls the Tuesday before the meet. And guess what happened to the second attempt? Couldn't hold on to it.

Mark Rippetoe:
Stupid idea. It was entirely attributed to the extra work I was going to do for my grip. Keep in mind the following fact: If your strength is going up on your squat, your deadlift, your bench and your press, then your strength is going up. And anything that's involved in the squat, the bench, the deadlift, and the press is getting stronger. If the numbers are going up.

Mark Rippetoe:
And this includes your ability to hang on to the deadlift, which means your grip is getting stronger. Nothing else is necessary. I know that you read all of this shit about all this assistance work and all the stuff that you're just not including in your in your training and you're just dying to do some of this fun stuff and buy some of this fun, hideously expensive equipment to to train the hole in your grip strength.

Mark Rippetoe:
If your deadlift goes from 225 to 405, there's not a hole in your grip strength training. Your deadlift goes from 405 to 605, your hands are strong. You got strong hands. And doing little squeezy things doesn't make them any stronger, A.

Mark Rippetoe:
B. It's extremely easy to overtrain your grip. Grip doesn't recover very fast as it turns out and I don't know why that is, but it's been my experience and the experience of a whole bunch people that grip strength training if you do a whole bunch of grip shit, it takes a while to get it recovered. And if during the process of getting recovered, it adversely affects your deadlift training, then you have fucked something up. Now, haven't you?

Mark Rippetoe:
So just... This is not as complicated as everybody else seems to want it to be. All right. Just make your deadlift go up and your hands are holding onto a heavier bar and therefore your grip is getting trained. OK.

Mark Rippetoe:
See? And the rest of this is not of any interest.

Mark Rippetoe:
Here is a pornography reference. Uh. It's about my memoirs from my decades in the porn industry. We've.... Rather, forget all of that. Such a horrible time in my life.

Mark Rippetoe:
Okay. "Staying on the spinal disc theme." Now what the hell does that mean? Staying on the spinal disc theme? Is this like a follow up to...

[off-camera]:
The one that asked if your spinal discs adapt to stress.

Mark Rippetoe:
Oh, that's probably what it was. From a previous podcast. I'm glad you remembered that, because I would not have had the slightest idea. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
"How and when do you reintroduce people." People..PPL..hadn't got time to type out the whole word. "That have undergone a discectomy procedure or like surgery back under the bar" Or like surgery. He means similar surgery. Back under the bar.

Mark Rippetoe:
Oh, you know, back under a light bar. Three weeks. Depends on what the procedure was. Depends on whether there's a prostheses involved. Just all these things, these injury questions, all are terribly individual.

Mark Rippetoe:
Ronnie's had couple back procedures and I think both times he's come back within a couple of weeks and gotten back under the bar. You have to go slow.

[off-camera]:
I've had one client, John, who had had a spinal stenosis, had that surgery and he's stronger than he's ever been in his life.

Mark Rippetoe:
That was Ronnie's first procedure, was that stenosis clean out. I'll eventually have to have it. And I've got some stenosis I can feel on occasion. Doesn't bother me right now, but I would imagine within 10 years I'm going to have to have that done too.

Mark Rippetoe:
And both those guys had real good outcomes from that. So when it comes time, I'm not going to. I'm not going to hesitate to have that particular one done.

Mark Rippetoe:
But I mean, back surgery's a big deal. You know. The numbers on back surgery aren't good. You know, it's about one third of the time back surgery is successful. In other words, the procedure did what the procedure was supposed to do. About a third of the time, nothing is improved. And about a third of the time, it's actually worse after the procedure. In other words, two thirds of the time, you'd rather have not done it.

Mark Rippetoe:
And this is like back surgery in general. It's in general, it's not a good idea. But if you get to the point where the pain is so bad that you can't do anything. You know, some people just, I mean, you've got punt, you know, do something.

Mark Rippetoe:
Okay. "Hi, Rip" He enjoys the podcast. He's a 56 year old male. College basketball player in his youth. 6'4" 220, lifting weights 20 years. Fucking around. Recently began to train. Always sucked at squatting. Couple of months ago made the commitment to not suck at squatting, progress being made, but slowly and I understand that's just the way it is. Also bought and been using the programming from the book Barbell Prescription.

Mark Rippetoe:
"I have a spinal abnormality, a sixth lumbar vertebra." Now, these things are not that uncommon. The extra chunk of bone, usually a fucked up little thing. That's anatomically not a complete vertebral body down there right above the sacrum. Sometimes they cause problems, sometimes they don't cause problems. Obviously not good original equipment.

Mark Rippetoe:
Age 15, he said he had suddenly, at extreme back pain, ended up in hospital couple weeks. Apparently, they found it with an x ray. And now he's you know, he had but he hadn't any problems with his lower back since that time. His auestion is: "I'm wondering this extra vertebrae could be the reason I can deadlift 390, but can only squat a weigth he's too embarrassed to say. "I think most high school girls can squat more than me. Currently adding 10 pounds to his squat every week,but he's concerned this mutant vertebra is going to limit squatting progress at some point. Or in end you back up in the hospital.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. I'd say that a 390 deadlift ought to calm you down quite a bit.

Mark Rippetoe:
In terms of getting your squat up, I mean, the deadlift loads the back, the squat loads the back. You know, they're not exactly the same. That's why we do them both, right? But I don't think that you need to be excessively worried about the squat and not the deadlift.

Mark Rippetoe:
I think that you need to belt everything you do. And I think you need to be cautious and drive the squat on up. Obviously, I don't know that it needs to go to 390, but it certainly needs to be, you know, past the high school girl phase and I don't see how a 390 deadlift wouldn't indicate to you that the squat couldn't at least come up, you know, quite a bit. So...

Mark Rippetoe:
OK. "Hi. Rip your article on curing elbow tendinitis helped me out a lot. A couple of months back, I'd been trying things like blood flow restriction to promote inflammation as well as avoiding benching. But all I needed in the end was to do chin ups and get back into it." Well, yeah.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Problem is, I've been having trouble with chin ups lately. I started developing pain in my finger joints proximal interpharangeal." This thing right here [shows where] "About a month ago after doing some heavy deadlifts. It's a dull pain. There's some stiffness. And I've noticed that using the supine grip on chin ups makes it worse. And if I use a mixed grip on deadlifts, the pain is worse in the supine hand. Mid 20s lifting seven years. Don't know what the fuck to do."

Mark Rippetoe:
Right. All right what? What is the thing with blood flow restriction and inflammation? You know what the hell he's talking about? I mean, blood flow restriction is kind of a hypertrophy deal, isn't it? Isn't that how that's generally...? Sounds stupid to me, too.

Mark Rippetoe:
So I don't know what he's been doing with that. I don't know if what he's done with that is not what's causing the problem in his hands. You would think? I mean, what does he tourniquet your wrist and then... I don't know.

[off-camera]:
I've seen people wrap the shit out of their elbows and knees with a with like an inner tube.

[off-camera]:
Yeah. Yeah.

[off-camera]:
But doing something like that would. Absolutely.

Mark Rippetoe:
I would think it would. So I don't know. I've. I have not got enough information here. Dull pain. Stiffness. I've never had that happen. And I don't have the slightest idea what could cause the supine position to be more of a problem than the prone position.

Mark Rippetoe:
I'm not recommending that you do a supine grip on your barbell rows anyway. People that have done that with heavy weights have ended up with some shoulder problems as a result of that. That was a bad idea I had previously.

Mark Rippetoe:
And. I don't know. I've never I've never had any. Ever had anything that would lead me to believe that this would happen as a normal consequence of of training. Therefore, I'm going to just wonder what the hell the blood flow restriction shit has done to you.

Mark Rippetoe:
I wonder... What? What if you train your neck muscles with blood flow restriction?

Mark Rippetoe:
Wouldn't that be hanging? It's called hanging. That's the short drop, probably, right?

[off-camera]:
Some people do it for fun.

Mark Rippetoe:
Yeah, I've heard of that. Can be dangerous.

[off-camera]:
Yeah. David Carradine.

Mark Rippetoe:
As our friend David learned to his chagrin.

Mark Rippetoe:
"My female non-lifter friend has had shoulder pain for months. The doctor said it's shoulder adhesive capsulits" Which is another way to say frozen shoulder. Right. "So she says she can't move her arms and that it causes fascia" I've never seen a spelled like this. "To build up in the muscles, which makes it difficult to move. The doctor said it takes 18 months to heal."

Mark Rippetoe:
Well, after all, he is a doctor.

[off-camera]:
I know people who have been in car accidents who don't take 18 months to heal, but you're sticky shoulder...

Mark Rippetoe:
Yeah, right. Like me. Motorcycle wrecks, horse wrecks. Nothing takes 18 months to heal. That's stupid. And how does it heal if you're not doing anything anyway? Just heals? How does a frozen shoulder get better if you don't move it?

[off-camera]:
The fascia dissolves.

Mark Rippetoe:
The fascia is bunched up in the muscles.

Mark Rippetoe:
This is a situation where we're dealing with English not as a first language.

Mark Rippetoe:
"I would imagine doing the press would fix this. Your thoughts?"

Mark Rippetoe:
Yeah it would.

Mark Rippetoe:
Ok. "Hey, Rip. I love the show. I'm 18 and wanted to know if you had an experience with scaphoid fractures, started three months and got somewhat strong deadlifting 390x5, squatting 310x5, when I hurt my wrist outside of the gym. Pain was not going away after the layoff, had surgery in December of last year."

Mark Rippetoe:
On a scaphoid fracture? You had surgery on a scaphoid fracture?

Mark Rippetoe:
"Before the surgery, pain stopped me from pressing and squatting, no pain when deadlifting is true for today as well. I'm currently not training."

Mark Rippetoe:
Well, I don't know what the hell they did to your wrist. And unless, you know, you'd care to share that with us, I don't believe that I can answer the question.

Mark Rippetoe:
I mean, scaphoid fractures typically take about six weeks to heal. And the you you kind of train through that. You have to brace the wrist, give it some support. A lot of people wear a wrist brace at night when they're sleeping to avoid rolling over on it and fuckinng it up like that. But typically, scaphoid fractures take about six weeks to heal, especially in young people like you're 18.

Mark Rippetoe:
I don't know what you allowed them to do to you, so I'm kind of helpless here.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. "Dear Rip. I'm at a crossroads and I have no idea what to do." Well, that describes my situation too. "Sometime right around seven years ago, I started to have some dysfunction in my right leg."

Mark Rippetoe:
Dysfunction. Who's he been talking to? Why we recognize that word, don't we?

Mark Rippetoe:
"I was unable to run properly due to knee and hip pain, walking became uncomfortable in certain exercises, caused pain in my knee."

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, he lists some numbers. He's 6', 230. His squat is 240. His deadlift is 330. His press is 125. And let's see. But this is all these are all pre-covid numbers because, of course, we can't train because the deadly covid19 virus might get transmitted to someone we know's grandmother, and then her death would be our fault.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Went do a physical therapist a few years back and it seemed to help. However, the issue's worse on my right side. I just watched your message "Is physical therapy fraud?" I agree with your stance. I was beginning to notice issues with their approach during my 2020 return to the PT office. Spent five hundred dollars this year in visits and still have issues. Issues is knee pain, hip, psoas discomfort."

Mark Rippetoe:
Psoas. They know that, of course.

Mark Rippetoe:
"And a seemingly significant misalignment on the right side of my lower body. Can you help me figure out how to fix this problem?" Right, then he gives me all of these issues.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. What's wrong with you?

Mark Rippetoe:
Has anybody not told you what the problem is? How much money have you spent with these fucking morons to have no diagnosis?

[off-camera]:
That's exactly right. They haven't told him.

Mark Rippetoe:
They haven't told him. He doesn't have the slightest idea what the problem is, and he he just knows he can't walk.

[off-camera]:
And he might not ever find out.

Mark Rippetoe:
He'll never find out if he keeps allowing them to not tell him.

Mark Rippetoe:
If you go to medical professionals. Right. Andd you pay them a whole bunch of money and they don't tell you what the problem is perhaps you should stop paying them money. Because if you don't know what the problem is, how are you going to know how to fix it?

Mark Rippetoe:
We don't just approach things with this bizarre shotgun approach, really, you know, put hot wax on your hand and then massage you on the back of the neck and then ice your knee and then, you know, do bands, you know, and wiggle your toes around and shit like that and end up with a great big physical therapy bill in the absence of a diagnosis of what it is they're trying to fix.

Mark Rippetoe:
Ryan, you're a fool. You're being played. All right. If the plumber comes to your house. You've got water in your floor. The plumber comes to your house and he doesn't tell you what's leaking, are you gonna have him back to the house next week?

Mark Rippetoe:
Right. I mean, we you know, we had to find out what's wrong before we can fix it.

[off-camera]:
It's more like the plumber comes over, you've got water all over your floor and he proceeds to install low flow showerheads on all your...

Mark Rippetoe:
Right. He puts low flow showerheads in all the bathrooms that aren't leaky.

[off-camera]:
Yeah. Right. And then leaves.

Mark Rippetoe:
And you go...wait! wait! wait. And he drives away.

Mark Rippetoe:
And he says on the way down the street, he says, "See you Wednesday!"

Mark Rippetoe:
Man, I don't know. You, my friend, have got some problems here. And you have paid people to help you with these problems and they haven't done it.

Mark Rippetoe:
Well, you hadn't paid me. So there you went [Tosses paper off desk] OK.

Mark Rippetoe:
Oh, that sounds awfully mercenary. I don't know, I do a lot of free shit for people, right? Don't you think? Yeah. If you come by. I'll be glad to look at you. No charge. I'm not a medical professional, so I can't I can't charge you for my opinions, which are probably worth quite a bit more than the people you've been seeing.

Mark Rippetoe:
Okay. "Hey, Rip, have nerve damage in my left shoulder, consequence of being a giant newborn."

Mark Rippetoe:
So this is This is an injury that was required, that was acquired during birth. I suppose. Like a forceps injury or something like that. It mashed things. It's amazing how dangerous childbirth can be when there's a doctor involved in it. Right.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Limits the range of motion in my left arm. I can't press overhead or get into the front rack position for cleans. Been following protocol. Been substituting weighted dips in place overhead press and barbell rows instead of cleans. No, it isn't optimal, but it's the cards I've been dealt. Time come at best, I've come up with in terms been able to follow linear progression."

Mark Rippetoe:
OK. You don't need to row instead of clean. If you can't clean, you don't clean. But you don't have to row instead of clean. If you want to row, that's fine. But you don't have to row. Right. And if you cannot, for anatomical reasons, get into an overhead press position, then you can't do overhead presses. OK.

Mark Rippetoe:
One thing you failed to mention here is if you can chin. I'd be interested to know if you could chin. I think if you can chin there, you'd apply force in that plane. And I think that maybe there is a way with professional help such as mine, that you might be able to eventually press. But, you know, these injury things, I'm telling you, these things are highly individual. You kind of got to be here, you know.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. "Hey, Rip. I was hoping you'd elaborate on training with spondylosis and/or spondylolisthesis. I'm a Forty four year old male, 250, I was diagnosed with spondylosis about six years ago. My doctor told me then never to deadlift, squat or pick anything up over my head."

Mark Rippetoe:
[Laughter] Oh, shit. Oh, this is... These questions so thoroughly reinforce my opinion about this thing. Oh, god.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right, let's see... he Started Starting Strength program at home two months ago. He's got 310x5s on squats. And he's got three fifty or a deadlift despite the fact that the doctor said to never do it.

Mark Rippetoe:
Right. The first sentence is the problem. All right. He says, "I was hoping you would elaborate on training with spondylosis and/or spondylolisthesis. Now, these are two completely different things.

Mark Rippetoe:
Basically spondylosis means your back hurts. OK. You've got some inflammatory process in your back. Could mean generalised back pain. Sometimes issues like that might mean pre arthritis, bony osteo arthritis, generalized inflammation of a portion of your spine.

Mark Rippetoe:
Spondylolisthesis is a very, very specific anatomical defect in the lumbar spine. It involves the displacement forward of the vertebral body segment relative to the one below it, and it is a potentially very serious injury. But the thing is graded from one to five.

Mark Rippetoe:
What a spondylolisthesis is is a separation of the vertebral body, the fat part of the vertebral segment that you are familiar with, from the structures posterior to it. The pars segments and all the overlapping lamina and all that other shit back there. A lot of times this is a - most of the time this is a congenital defect that the thing didn't form correctly. And now it's a it becomes a problem.

Mark Rippetoe:
Sometimes these things are not a problem. And they're diagnosed on normal X-rays without any displacement of the vertebral body at all relative to the one below it. And that's grade one. A grade five is a full displacement.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now my friend Ellen Stein, who's probably the strongest female master's lifter in the world is deadlifting at the age of 67. She's deadlifting over 400. At 132 with a grade three spondylolisthesis. So I guess strength is important here. You know, if I've got a loose segment like that, I think I want to be as strong as I can stay. Keep it stable, strong is stable. Right.

Mark Rippetoe:
But you're throwing the word spondylolisthesis in here and then don't speak about it again.

Mark Rippetoe:
Your doctor told you never to deadlift. Now you're deadlifting 350 for three sets of five on your deadlift. I don't recommend sets across on the deadlift so you hadn't read my program, but it seems to me like you just proved your doctor wrong.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Rip, I'm in my early 40s having difficulties with my wrists and thumb joints."

Mark Rippetoe:
Oh, and good God, he went to the orthopedic doctor for evaluation, told that X-ray showed early onset arthritis in his thumbs, no signs of wrist issues. Carpal tunnel syndrome is not present. Said symptoms look consistent for someone who aggressively uses their hands.

Mark Rippetoe:
Well, some of us aggressively use our hands. That happens some more than others. Some of us in our sell insurance and then some of us fixed fences. Right. He says he's spent a lot of time as a musician, a carpenter, mechanic and stress of stresses, a computer operator.

Mark Rippetoe:
Why would you think computer operation is hard on your hand?

[off-camera]:
I guess moving your finger a bunch?

Mark Rippetoe:
What else are you gonna do with your fingers? Not move them? Karate chop, everything. You type with a karate chop. How do you do that?

[off-camera]:
Do people who deadlift get carpal tunnel? Do you know anybody with carpal tunnel?

Mark Rippetoe:
The only people that deadlift that get carpal tunnel are also using growth hormone. Now, I've never actually heard of carpal tunnel on a deadlifter. It's not a common thing. You know.

Mark Rippetoe:
Not only has the... But he says he didn't have any carpal tunnel, he just he's got arthritis in his fingers and thumbs. I'd like to know if for sure you have osteoarthritis and not rheumatoid because some of these symptoms overlap. I would I would check for that, because if you've got rheumatoid arthritis, you've got a different situation.

Mark Rippetoe:
Grip strength, lessen pain in the wrist becomes so bad, flexion hurts, but it's not numbness like carpal tunnel apparently. Limiting his ability to perform barbell lifts at appropriate weight loads.

Mark Rippetoe:
I don't know, Steve, what other shit you're doing in your training. I don't know what else you're doing outside your training that's irritating your your hands. But if you are squatting correctly with a correct grip, deadlifting with a correct grip, pressing it, benching with the correct grip, there's not really any wrist movement in any of that. Any of that movement pattern stuff we use for those three basic four basic lifts.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, the clean can aggravate a wrist, clean can aggravate your wrists. You get a scaphoid fracture easily doing a clean if you're doing squat clean's and slam your elbow in your knee. Happens all the time.

Mark Rippetoe:
I would... You know, not knowing anything more about what you're doing. Have you had somebody that's good at reading wrist x rays look at your wrist? It may be that you have a scaphoid fracture. We talked about that earlier in the podcast.

Mark Rippetoe:
I'd like to know how it happened, but I don't. Again, this is one of these sayings where it's an injury thing. The details are terribly important and I don't have enough detail. So that's just. Sorry...

Mark Rippetoe:
OK. Now look. [Shows walls of text] This won't now work. This is not what we want. Don't do this for the podcast. This is sent to Starting Strength Radio.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. I don't need. This is a this is a personal training consultation. All right. This is not a.... Oh god [Throws text down]

Mark Rippetoe:
Look, the last thing, though. This is what we want to see.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Dearest Rip." Already, I'm in a better frame of mind.

[off-camera]:
Wait until the next sentence.

Mark Rippetoe:
"I have a wrist problem."

Mark Rippetoe:
Hey, who doesn't? You know? What 19 year old kid doesn't have a wrist problem. Usually on the right hand.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Whenever I do under weight."

[off-camera]:
That's a masterbation joke.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Wrist Pronation, flexion, extension, rotation, I get this feeling of bones sliding against one another. There is. There is no pain, but the feeling is extremely uncomfortable."

Mark Rippetoe:
Well, now, "that's uncomfortable" is not what we normally associate with excessive masturbation.

[off-camera]:
Up and down. Quit doing the circle thing.

Mark Rippetoe:
What can I do about this? I'm 19 years old.

[off-camera]:
Oh, this is really a risk question. Jesus.

Mark Rippetoe:
He does't like the way his bones slide around. Fuck, man. I don't know.

Mark Rippetoe:
You said that it doesn'thurt your wrist.

[off-camera]:
Wear a wrist wrap.

Mark Rippetoe:
Do you know how many people's wrists hurt? We've got to do something about that. Your wrist I'm not concerned with because it doesn't hurt and you're 19. And God Almighty,

[off-camera]:
Need a Starting Strength wrist wrap for all these wrist problems.

Mark Rippetoe:
They'd sell wouldn't they. Hold it! Get that off.

[off-camera]:
Fix all that wrists and get elbow tendonitis.

Mark Rippetoe:
Goes all the way up and then the shoulders. And then the shoulders. You get bicep tendonitis and then exter..., the external rotators get all sore and shit.

Mark Rippetoe:
Well, we beat that one to death, didn't we? That's about all we can do with it. OK.

Mark Rippetoe:
Thanks for being here. So much fun.

[off-camera]:
Hey, where did you go to get your cool shirt?

Mark Rippetoe:
My cool shirt. Fenix. The ammo guys, man. You guys gave me the shirt looks pretty cool, but yes, it's tucked in. You don't like that?

Mark Rippetoe:
Bre likes it. Bre's tucking her shirts in these days. I think people that don't tuck their shirts in are slobs, myself. You're slobs. You're just slobs.

Mark Rippetoe:
Me and Bre are....I mean, good grooming is important wouldn't you say, Bre? I wash my hair, you wash your hair and didn't shower? In the sink. You wash your hair in the sink? Do people still do that?

[off-camera]:
No, I showered but I washed my hair when I showered.

Mark Rippetoe:
You don't normally wash your hair when you shower? Well, you're a lazy pile of shit, aren't you? What does it take, 30 seconds?

[off-camera]:
Natural oils are good for you.

Mark Rippetoe:
Put the soap, you know, rinse it off.

[off-camera]:
The natural oils are good for your hair.

Mark Rippetoe:
Rusty, I don't know if anyone ever told you this, but your head is pretty greasy. I don't think your natural oils are being under produced. All right.

[off-camera]:
You can tolerate every other day.

Mark Rippetoe:
Yeah, you probably break down and wash your head when you're in the in the shower, you know, and you might find you might find that people, you know, treat you better.

Mark Rippetoe:
Yeah, you do. Yeah, you do, Rusty. You want to be treated better.

[off-camera]:
Just try it for a week.

Mark Rippetoe:
Yeah. See what happens. Try to week too if you don't see if you don't like it.

Mark Rippetoe:
Okay. Bye. See you next Friday.

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Mark Rippetoe answers Starting Strength Radio fan questions and responds to Comments from the Haters.

  • 00:00 Intro
  • 01:04 Comments from the Haters!
  • 06:51 Coronavirus disease?
  • 08:33 Deadwood movie
  • 11:15 Full ROM vs matching sport-specific movement
  • 14:32 How to strengthen a shoulder with rotator cuff tears?
  • 15:47 Hernias (again!) and deadlifts
  • 23:12 Increase weights after heart surgery?
  • 25:19 Tendon popping over during the squat
  • 28:08 Breaking up NLP into more workouts
  • 32:34 Box squat warmup?
  • 37:39 Adding grip training to SS NLP
  • 43:12 Getting back under the bar after back surgery
  • 46:04 Squatting with extra vertebra
  • 48:53 Finger pain/blood flow restriction
  • 52:32 Fixing frozen shoulder?
  • 53:55 Scaphoid fracture mystery
  • 55:30 No PT diagnosis despite $$$$$$$$$$$$$$!
  • 1:00:56 Modified program with nerve injury
  • 1:03:01 Not supposed to sq/dl/ohp, but...
  • 1:06:58 Wrist injury?
  • 1:11:06 Not what we want
  • 1:11:52 Wrist bones sliding
  • 1:14:12 Where did you get your shirt?

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