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Q&A Episode - What's the Worst Injury Rip Has Had? | Starting Strength Radio #16

Mark Rippetoe | August 09, 2019

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Mark Rippetoe:
"Mark Rippetoe is the Alex Jones of fitness."

Mark Wulfe:
From The Aasgaard Company studios in beautiful Wichita Falls, Texas... From the finest mind in the modern fitness industry... The one true voice in the strength and conditioning profession... The most important podcast on the internet... Ladies and gentlemen... Starting Strength Radio.

Mark Rippetoe:
Thank you, Mark Wulfe. Welcome back to Starting Strength Radio Starting Strength Radio is the title of our little podcast here. Why do we call it Starting Strength Radio?

Mark Rippetoe:
You know, I don't remember why that was a good idea. Rusty, what was the... What did we decide the deal was on that? Because it's obviously not radio. It's video.

[off-camera]:
It's a video, but it's a podcast.

Mark Rippetoe:
It's a podcast. And most podcasts are audio only.

[off-camera]:
Yeah, but we're more interesting.

Mark Rippetoe:
Like if you listen to most people, listen to Joe Rogan and don't watch him, right. Is that the deal? Because really there's nothing to watch there anymore than there is here. Right. You're just watching some guys around a table with headphones on headphones, wearing headphones, talking to each other. And the headphones are just fine, if you're doing an audio podcast because you can't hear the headphones. I don't like the way they look. They mar the beauty of my face and head.

[off-camera]:
I think there are some comments about your haircut.

Mark Rippetoe:
There might be. In comments from the haters.

Mark Rippetoe:
We always like to start with these. Bre gathers these from the internet every week for us to read. Where do you get all these damn things? From YouTube comments is that where?

[off-camera]:
From the bottom 3 percent.

Mark Rippetoe:
YouTube. YouTube comments. All right. Cuandoman. Cuandorman says "Mark is not that you're fat or even that you can't run. It's the fact that you look like you're covered in a shag carpet of hair, you damn sasquatch."

Mark Rippetoe:
Oh shit. Well. You know. Yeah, kinda.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. And see, The Depraved Eunuch says... no, Epoch. I'm sorry. I'm sorry. I didn't mean to be insulting. "Mark Rippetoe is the Alex Jones of Fitness.".

[off-camera]:
That's my favorite one.

Mark Rippetoe:
Sure, all right.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Rip has some kind of allergy? Always snuffling a little bit." [Rip snuffles a little bit]

Mark Rippetoe:
And then Mitch Schuter says, "That may be what he has. I've wondered, is he on the Tourette's spectrum and is it just a tick? His arm also has a tick, and he can really vocalize strongly. These are all symptoms of Tourette's, which varies in severity among individuals."

[off-camera]:
You do walk around the gym just screaming "fuck" every now and then, so.

Mark Rippetoe:
Who doesn't? Who doesn't do that? That's not Tourette's. That's just frustration.

Mark Rippetoe:
Okay. Oh, this is a good one here. What's this guy's name? I can't really read this. Bre, make this bigger next time. Because I can't. It says garlic. Garlic's good?

Mark Rippetoe:
He says - I'm going to read this as it's typed - "I'd fuck you all up and I ain't had no training pussies."

[off-camera]:
That was on Nick's episode. The fighting one.

Mark Rippetoe:
Yeah, the fighting episode he's going to fuck us all up, right.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Dude y'all can't even run around the block without almost passing out. You can't fight. Cardio is the most important thing after technique. You both have neither. Go just do a good like 10 minutes sparring and film it. L o l let's see.

Mark Rippetoe:
He thinks a fight lasts 10 minutes. Maybe between... and this is a guy named Jen or Cin or something like... maybe between he and his mother- in-law that he usually spars with those last ten minutes, but... That's interesting.

Mark Rippetoe:
And let's see. That's probably enough of this shit. "Rippetoe looks like he traded a homeless dude crack for a shit-ass haircut. Suck my clit, Rip." OK.

[off-camera]:
So that...What was his name? What was his name?

Mark Rippetoe:
His name is...Uncle Weenus. That's Uncle Weenies.

[off-camera]:
Uncle Weenus fully admitted that he had a clitoris.

Mark Rippetoe:
Uncle Weenus has a clitoris. Should be Aunt Weenus, right? Or is that is that sexist? Or is that transphobia?

[off-camera]:
Maybe he identifies...

Mark Rippetoe:
Transphobia and I'm widely regarded as "transphobic."

Mark Rippetoe:
Uh. Hardur Edge Lord. "No wonder you're the laughing stock of the fitness industry. No professionalism whatsoever.".

Mark Rippetoe:
Well, we're trying to be professional by, you know, giving everyone a voice here on the on the Comments from the Haters. And let's close with the always favorite, "Why are Mark's nipples hard? Is he some kind of...is he some kind of pervert?".

Mark Rippetoe:
I love that one. Don't ever...don't ever leave that out, Bre. You're just you're doing such a fine job. OK.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, this week is Q&A. You'll notice [motions to empty chair] nobody here but me. So we're just going to talk to you. I'm going to read your questions. I'm going to try as seriously as I can to approach the answer to these questions in order to provide information that you obviously don't have now, else you would not have asked the question. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Let's begin. All right. And these are all stupid names, so I'm just gonna leave them out because these are actually not terrible questions to ask. "For online Starting Strength coaching, what would be the best camera setup to provide the coach with the optimum view to make suggestions? I'm sure a smartphone could be made to work, but maybe you've got a better idea. Who knows? It could happen."

Mark Rippetoe:
I'm not your online coaching guy. I've got one client I'm working with right now, but it's it's difficult. I'll tell you, it's difficult. It's not as easy a thing as as you might think it is. And those people who are effective at online coaching have figured out how to do it.

Mark Rippetoe:
The problem is a lot of people who think they are effective at online coaching are in fact not and are not making the form corrections that should be made because of the inherent problem with online coaching.

Mark Rippetoe:
And the inherent problem with online coaching is that you cannot cue. Cues are delivered in real time on the platform to affect the next rep. Cueing is an extremely important part of platform coaching. The platform... the effective platform coach has got a huge amount of experience that comes from having done the coaching part and having done the lifting part -b eing under the bar so that the coach knows what the lifter is experiencing under the bar. And can take his observations of what is going on with the lifter under the bar, filter those observations through his own experience, provide a comment based on the evaluation of the form he is taught, and then provide communication to the lifter right now to fix that rep, to fix the next rep. That can't happen with online coaching, and this is one of the biggest problems with attempting to do online coaching.

Now online coaching may be the best option you've got. It's not perfect by any means, but it may be the best option you've got. And some people are better at it than others. People who are better at it, though, are the people that have had extensive experience in actual coaching online... on the platform, I'm sorry. People who are better at it have had extensive experience in coaching on the platform and know that what they're seeing is not going to be immediately available to fix the next rep and can tailor their comments to try at least to work around the fact that they're not actually cueing the lifter.

Mark Rippetoe:
OK, the camera angle is terribly important because that's going to be the source of the coach's observational interaction with with the lifter's training that day. So in order to set up the camera angles best. I found it necessary to see the lifter from a... about a 30 degree posterior oblique angle with the camera backed off far enough to mimic the view that the coach would have were he's standing 30 degrees behind the lifter off to the side about five or six feet.

Mark Rippetoe:
The other camera angle would be that same degree of relief from 30 degrees anterior, from the front. And these two should provide quite a bit of exposure to the... to the movement that the lifter is is communicating with the videoed set of five.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, it's it's obvious that we're not cueing the lifter when we see this thing and give feedback later. What I have done is had my client take a video, post it - and we're using Facebook Messenger - post the video and then call me and I'll discuss what what she has just done and what I'm looking at and give my impressions for what I would cue were I there in person. And figure out a different way to communicate that then I would be able to do were I commenting on her movement pattern under the bar in real time. And then I give these instructions and then I'm - because they're not cues, they're instructions - and then I go back.

Mark Rippetoe:
I have her go back to the bar to the next set, video the set, send it to me and call me so that we're in relatively near-time communication about this. But it's not ideal. But if she's in Canada and I'm in Texas, it's the only way we can get this done.

Mark Rippetoe:
And you know, you have to admit that that with sufficient interaction you can get quite a bit accomplished, but it's not ideal. All right. But for someone that's not in a position to be coached in front of me, the correction I can make in 30 seconds, you know, might take 10, 15, 20 minutes and it might take two weeks.

If I can actually coach you on the platform. I could put my hands on you and put you in the position that you don't seem to understand that I'm explaining. I want you to be. And this saves a lot of time. It saves quite a bit of time. And online coaching is not really what you'd call coaching.

It's more of a form check. And if if the online coach is gonna make comments on what he sees in the video, he may have three or four times to review the whole video before he presents his his conclusions. An actual coach has a rep to assess what he sees and compare it to the model and give communication based on what he thinks you need to do to get closer to the model. This happens in real time, whereas online coaching does not necessarily have to happen in real time, and a shitty online coach might just have a, you know, five or six pieces of instruction that they can cut and paste into a response. And as you know, low quality online coaching gets down to that quite often.

Mark Rippetoe:
So, you know, there are several problems with it. But again, it may be the only option you got. So try it for yourself and see if it see if it works, if it helps you keep paying for it. If it if it doesn't help you, then get another online coach or figure out a way to get in front of the coach on a semi regular basis. Right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, as far as the camera situation, I don't know that a modern smartphone is not going to be your best option. I think it probably is your best option. Everybody's got one pretty much and they make tripods for the thing that, you know, you can set it up at any angle. It's got audio. I don't know that there's any reason to have a better camera situation than than you will you will run into with you with an average smartphone setup. I don't I don't have a better idea for that.

Mark Rippetoe:
Yeah. The thing I've tried to remember was bar path. All right. Look, you you are going to be 30 degrees oblique behind and 30 degrees only forward. All right. And as I explained in my article about the Master Cue, you are not going to have a bar path that is vertical over the middle of the foot until the weight gets heavy. All right. It's not possible to do that because of it combined center of mass considerations that are explained in that article.

Mark Rippetoe:
What you do know is that when the weight gets heavy, the bar will be in balance over the middle of the foot in a squat, for example, whether you want it to be or not. So I don't think you need to see a direct profile, parallel eyeballs to the bar to determine the bar path. Because it doesn't matter.

Mark Rippetoe:
An empty bar is not gonna be vertical to the midfoot. A light warmup is not gonna be vertical to the midfoot. And in a novice lifter, even a work set is probably not going to be vertical to the midfoot and won't be until the lifter gets strong enough to have to get into that degree of balance. And that may be for a while. So that's at. And I think those two angles forward, 30 degree, oblique and backward, 30 degree oblique are enough to see what's going on in terms of our ability to determine bar path considerations and pretty much everything else.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, the only other angle that might be useful would be a direct behind the lifter and this would show us any knee and hip asymmetries that we need to see that would have something to do with with with a a curve in the back, in asymmetrical use of the knees, that would help diagnose a potential severe leg length discrepancy. These kinds of symmetry issues are visible strictly... straight from the back, directly behind the lifter. So we need to see that too.

Mark Rippetoe:
Need to see one of the work sets from that angle to make sure nothing is going wrong that we can't see from the side. Other than that, I think I think we've adequately dealt with it question, don't you think? Eon't you think so?

Mark Rippetoe:
All right, now: "Is volume the primary driver of hypertrophy?"

Mark Rippetoe:
You know... well volume's sure popular these days. If volume was the primary driver of hypertrophy, all crossfitters would have 33 inch thighs because of the hundreds of air squats they do, right? I don't think that you can...I don't think that you can say that volume by itself is the primary driver of hypertrophy. And this kind of simplistic misreading of the literature is is not useful and is sidelined quite a few people from making even decent progress with their training.

Mark Rippetoe:
If you want to do a bunch of light reps you, you want to do eight sets of seven, go ahead and do eight sets of seven. I don't care. As long as you're paying your gym dues and having a good time in the gym, I don't really give a shit whether you're getting stronger or not. Doesn't matter to me. You know, it's not in my vested interest that you get stronger. You know, the only things in my vested interest is to tell you the correct shit. And I think I've already done that.

Mark Rippetoe:
But I wanted to read you this from Lyle McDonald now. Lyle and I have had our problems in the past, but I have never said that Lyle didn't know what the fuck he was talking about because Lyle knows what the fuck he's talking about. And his diet advice is some of the first stuff I'd read a long, long time ago. And Lyle is on the money, Lyle's a sharp guy. He's an obnoxious, mentally ill fucker, but I don't think even he'd disagree with that. I may hear from him. We'll see.

Mark Rippetoe:
But but by the same token, Lyles got his head out of his ass and you need to pay attention to what he's telling you. And I'm going to read you something that he wrote about this very thing and you pay attention to what I'm reading to you. Okay.

Mark Rippetoe:
"At the end of the day, no matter what else you do, to generate further growth, you need to increase the tension overload requirements. Yes, there are other progression methods, but progressive tension overload in terms of increasing the load is the primary one over the long term. This isn't even debatable, even if folks continue to debate it and literally every study, no matter how they say they are studying, has progressive tension overload built into the protocol. The methods always describe that loads are being adjusted during the workout and throughout the study. It's an assumed part of the protocol because without it, nothing happens.

Mark Rippetoe:
"And this means that what these studies are actually asking is what happens if we compare these different frequencies or volumes when progressive overload is already present? Everything else being examined, everything else is a secondary factor of study, even if nobody but me seems to have noticed it.

Mark Rippetoe:
"People continue to argue against the above, especially in the era of volume is the primary driver on growth bull shit.

Mark Rippetoe:
"I'm told that one brain surgeon argued that adding weight to the bar is a negative because it reduces his volume and I will laugh and laugh. And in six months when he has seen no progress and realizes that I was right all along. Already mentioned that every study showing effective growth outside of what it thinks it's studying frequency, volume, etc is done on a base of progressive weight overload. It is fundamental to the training process. You can prove this all to yourself easily."

Mark Rippetoe:
"Go to your gym and pick out a few regulars and note their current training poundages. Come back in a year. The guys who are lifting sufficiently heavier weights, heavier weights will have grown and the guys lifting the same weights have not grown. No matter how much volume or frequency they throw at it. They will be doing the same bullshit two hour chest workout every Monday with the same weight and look exactly the same as the year before.

Mark Rippetoe:
"OK. That's not true for some gym trainees. They'll get bigger if they don't add weight to the bar, but focus on volume. But in this case, it's their volume of anabolic steroids. Trust me. Double from 600 mg a week to twelve hundred mg a week, and you'll grow better than doubling your set count or adding weight to the bar. Drugs beat out all of this."

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, I'd have a little disagreement with Lyle on that and I'll come back to after this next paragraph.

Mark Rippetoe:
"And I think that if you look at a lot of arguments, that volume is the primary driver on growth wat you'll find is that it's not the training driving the bus, but rather the special sports supplements being used. As I said in Part 1, a lot of goofy, stupid, inefficient, ineffective bullshit works pretty well when your dosage is high enough.".

Mark Rippetoe:
And that's Lyles take on the thing.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, as I said, Lyle has his head out of his ass, especially with respect to this comment, because this is just what you'd learn having been in this business for as long as myself and Lyle have been in this business. Okay.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now I would disagree with him on one minor detail. For a novice... for a novice doing our novice approach of the program, adding weight, every single workout over all the exercises, as fast as the load will go up without overfacing the trainee and who is eating enough food and getting enough rest and consuming enough protein and managing all the recovery aspects, that individual is going to grow faster on that kind of a program than a guy doing a shitty program, taking a bunch of drugs because the novice effect is profound. It's extremely profound.

Mark Rippetoe:
The male human body, when loaded and fed, grows very, very quickly. When that same male human body is loaded inadequately or ineffectively, but still provided with steroids, the growth does not happen at the same rate that it would for a novice who's doing training and eating correctly. As we've described many times. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Aside from that, that one little diversion. This is [waves printed out article]... Don't ignore him. Don't ignore me either, because we know what the hell we're talking about okay.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now Owen says, "I have no cartilage on the inside of my left knee. I've seen several doctors who've said I can get a partial knee replacement, but I should wait as long as possible. They indicate the replacement is not meant for a very active adult and that I should not squat or deadlift now or have... or after any type of knee replacement. Do you have experience working with people who've had knee/hip replacements?"

Mark Rippetoe:
Yes, we do. All of us have replacement - hip replacement, knee replacement - experience. Your doctor is wrong. Your doctor is for the surgery. Hire the guy that does the surgery best and leave subsequent activity to people who actually know what the hell they're talking about because your doctor doesn't know what the hell he's talking about. The fact that he knows how to repair the car does not mean that he's a race car driver.

Mark Rippetoe:
Ok. This is... This is a this is a common mistake that doctors make. They think that because they're doctors, they're entitled to an opinion about everything on Earth that has anything even remotely related to do with what the hell they're talking about when they do the surgery. They don't know anything about this. I mean, we've got people that are deadlifted well over 500 a year after a knee double knee replacement.

[off-camera]:
I have a client who is in his late 60s and he's got two knee replacements and he squats in... up one ninety, low two hundreds.

Mark Rippetoe:
Yeah. Well look at Phil Anderson. Phil Anderson is not the smartest human being on earth. And he pushed on his knee prostheses way too hard. But he got a 600 deadlift eleven months after the surgery. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, I'm not recommending that you do that. I'm just saying what's occurred and your doctor doesn't know what's occurred, yet he assumes that he knows what's going to occur and he doesn't. OK.

Mark Rippetoe:
Here's but... the reason I included this question in in the Q and A today is because of the fact that I keep hearing people with... who are in a situation where they need a knee prosthesis or a hip prosthesis - from the doctor, that they want you to wait as long as possible before you have it done.

Mark Rippetoe:
Wait on what? For you to detrain to the point that your quality of life suffers because you're a weak pile of shit, because you've got a bad hip and you can't squat? You've got bad knees and you can't train.

Mark Rippetoe:
Why do you not want people to train, doc? You don't understand anything about this. You don't understand the benefits of training, you know, understand the benefits of having strong hip musculature around the hip, strong leg musculature around the knees. You don't understand how fast a guy can get back to strength levels after the surgery. You don't understand how fast an older woman, for example, can get strong after you remove the pain impediment that she is dealing with every day because she needs new knees or needs a hip. All right. And how important subsequent strength training is to her quality of life.

Mark Rippetoe:
You don't understand this. And as a result, you, in an attempt to cover your ass recommend that people not train because that's what you're doing. When you recommend that people wait as long as they can to have this thing replaced, this bad joint replaced, that you have the ability to easily and quickly replace inexpensively even. What you're recommending is that these people get weak. You're recommending that these people detrain. And that they don't get strong and they don't train and they don't improve their daily life because you don't want... you keep telling them you're gonna. Well, you get this hip replaced. It's gonna have to be replaced again in 15 years.

Mark Rippetoe:
Boys and girls. 15 years of not training? Because of a subsequent operation the patient might have? Which completely ignores any advances in technology that might happen over the next 15 years that might make a reentry into that joint prostheses a whole lot easier than it is right now. You don't know what's going to happen. But because you don't know what's going to happen and because you're... you think you're doing a responsible thing recommended that these people sit in the chair for the next 15 years instead of train, you're recommending the worst possible thing that you can recommend to them.

Mark Rippetoe:
If you need a hip, if you need a knee, go get a god damn thing done. Don't listen to p... find another surgeon that'll actually, you know, that actually wants to do this surgery. If you need the... if you need a knee and you can't train because your knee's that screwed up go get the knee so you can train, so you can get strong, so that you can enjoy the benefits of being strong and out of pain. Pain is bad, chronic bad, chronic joint pain is bad. Keeps you from sleep and uses you. It uses a guy up.

Mark Rippetoe:
And in fact, you know, I'm sorry, I have to get all wound up about this kind of thing, but I hear this shit all the time and it's just cowardice and a lack of information on the part of orthopedic surgeons that have a problem with this.

Mark Rippetoe:
Look, I understand that there's a slight risk of not waking up from general anesthesia every time you you go into the into the OR. I understand that. All right. But I also understand that there is a gigantic risk of a person dying prematurely and more importantly, failing to enjoy the time they've got left, if you fix it up so that they can't get stronger than they are right now.

Mark Rippetoe:
Strength is very important. All right. As we've dealt with many times, strength is the most important physical attribute, especially for somebody who's not very strong already. And I think that you really need to think hard about this. I understand that you would be reluctant to recommend a knee replacement for a 28 year old kid. You know, by the same token. There's no real mechanism for a 28 year old kid to wear his knees out and it's probably an acute problem. You probably know this and you've probably done some knee replacements on injured knees.

Mark Rippetoe:
But I'd I'd think... what I'd ask you to do is go to that same thought process that was involved in deciding to go ahead and do a prosthetic knee on a 28 year old kid. And the process was, well, he's 28. He needs his knees. He's a young guy, needs to be able to move around. He can't enjoy his life.

Mark Rippetoe:
Why would you not apply that same calculus to a 60 year old knee? You think 60 year old people just need to sit down and shut up? You're 60. Strength is not for you. You need to learn how to play canasta. OK. Add another card game, maybe get a box of dominoes. Learn how to play dominoes, but just sit down. I mean, your active years are behind you and you just need to figure out how to best enjoy your intellectual existence.

Mark Rippetoe:
It's sickening. That's pathetic and sickening and if you actually think that get out of the medical profession. Go kill yourself. Do something because you're not doing anything good for anybody. You're really not. Learn better than that. OK.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now let's see. John Craig. Joe Craig. It's a J O H H. Is that a typo? That's the way it was entered? Joe Craig. Juuuuh Craig. "Why does it apparently never make sense to train non-human animals for strength?"

Mark Rippetoe:
Well, I don't know that it never makes sense. I know I know, guys that... I have known guys that had dogs involved in pulling contests.

[off-camera]:
Yeah, I was about to bring that up.

Mark Rippetoe:
Oh, yeah. And they have weighted sleds for the dogs. You know, I I wouldn't say that it never makes sense to train non-human animals for strength. You know.

Mark Rippetoe:
I don't know how draft horse guys train them or if they just rely on the natural genetics of draft animals. I don't know. I would imagine that a draft horse team pulling and pulling a wagon could be train progressively for resistance by loading heavier heavy loads into the wagon. If they haven't done that I don't know why it hadn't occurred to them. Should have occurred to them. But that didn't necessarily make any sense. As far as animals.I mean, vertebrate physiology is, you know, vertebrate physiology. So I I'm not going to assume that everybody is as stupid as, you know, D1 and pro strength and conditioning coaches. How would... I wouldn't say that about a draft horse trainer.

Mark Rippetoe:
No, but to continue. "Well, fella, those comments about Canada have gotten me and the boys mighty upset. Don't ya know? We're sorry you don't like our border people, but Canada was strong while Texas was still getting its rear end kicked by Mexico."

Mark Rippetoe:
Canada has been strong? No, Canada's just been real cold. The only reason Canada hasn't been occupied in and annexed by, for example, us here in Texas is because so much of the country is a fucking Arctic wasteland. It just wouldn't pay to do that. John. Joe. Juhhh. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
"And by the way, do you realize Texas is way smaller than some of our provinces?" ... that are completely covered with ice and snow, polar bears and mosquitoes and other every other goddamn thing? "We're a real country. You're just an afterthought of a state."

Mark Rippetoe:
Oh, that stings.

Mark Rippetoe:
"We have worse winters. eh. We have words matters, eh, but we're not a hot desert for nine months either."

Mark Rippetoe:
Well we're not either, Juhhh. We're a hot desert for three months.

[off-camera]:
Can I correct you? This isn't "Juhhh," this is Canada Dry on Tap.

Mark Rippetoe:
Canada dry on tap. Oh, Juhhh was the on.... Oh, I see what you're saying. Canada dry on tap has asked this. All right. Well, this is a printing error.

Mark Rippetoe:
So I'm yelling. I'm not I'm not yelling at Juhh. I'm yelling at Canada Dry on tap here. I thought this is a continuation of Juhh's.

[off-camera]:
We apologize, Juhh.

Mark Rippetoe:
I'm sorry, Canada dry on tap is the is is the guy here. OK.

[off-camera]:
It is a good name.

Mark Rippetoe:
It is a good name. They're a real country. We're just an afterthought of the state though.

Mark Rippetoe:
"In programming, Canada is advanced and Texas is still in novice progression. Eh?".

Mark Rippetoe:
All right, let me ask you a question. Let me ask you a question, Canada. Has anybody ever declared war on Canada?

Mark Rippetoe:
Think the answer is no? I think the answer is probably no. The. Maybe that indicates your level of importance.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, I guess probably Canada participated with the United States in World War Two as part of the Allies.

Mark Rippetoe:
Oh, they did great. They've done fabulous done fabulous work alongside us several times alongside us. But the problem here is that your border people. You need to fire all of them and hire people with, you know, like...manners and intelligence. If you can find any in Canada.

OK. Now, "what's the worst injury you've had? What happened? How'd you rehab it?".

Mark Rippetoe:
Well, that one is easy. I had a real bad motorcycle wreck in 1994. A bad motorcycle wreck. I was riding down the street. Woman turned left in front of me. That happens all the time to motorcycles. They don't see you. Hell, I had my headlight on. They don't see you because they're not looking. They're not looking. They're not looking down the street.

[off-camera]:
They can look right at you.

Mark Rippetoe:
They can look right at you and not see your ass. And that's exactly what I think happened. But when I saw her - because I saw all this happen - I saw her. She was looking into the parking lot. She was turning into not down the road at me. And I was going about 40 down the road and she turned in front of me.

Mark Rippetoe:
And I just had a few seconds to react to this. So I jerked the bike over to the left and managed to hit... to not t-bone the bitch right in the front passenger door, but I managed to clip the back of the car. So the bike went right down the bumper and my leg stayed on the fender. And my knee, my right knee was jerked back over here someplace. Bike goes down, I go skittering down to pavement. It was a you know, potentially bad, bad deal.

Mark Rippetoe:
And it was a bad deal. It destroyed my knee. Completely ruptured my ACL, MCL, retinaculum. And yeah, it was a it was kind of a mess and cut me up, fucked up my hands. You know. I got up on top of the bike. Somehow managed to get up on top of the bike as it's sliding down the street and, you know, crippled me up pretty good.

Mark Rippetoe:
Had to have the knee reconstructed. And you have no idea how bad that hurt. Not the wreck itself. I didn't feel anything until hours later. You know, a ruptured tendon, ruptured ligaments, that kind of stuff don't have any pain receptors in them and until the whole area gets swollen and inflamed it doesn't really hurt. But two hours later, I was in pretty bad pain.

Mark Rippetoe:
Pain that I was in at that after that wreck was a result of the surgery. They did a patellar tendon graft on me and they harvested the middle one-third of my patellar tendon and used that to replace the ACL. So there's a whole bunch of drilling around on your patella. And a whole bunch of drilling around on distal femur, proximal tibia. Drilling holes - and you look up this patella tendon graft thing and see how it's done and what the the procedure is very, very invasive.

Mark Rippetoe:
And I had I have never experienced pain like I experienced in the hospital. One of the problems that I have with with major injuries like this is I'm one of these people that does not respond with analgesia to opiate analgesics. You can give me hydrocodone all day long and all it does is keep me from coughing. It doesn't do anything in terms of analgesia.

Mark Rippetoe:
From what I understand, about 10 percent of the population is in this boat. And apparently the the the drug is metabolized before it reaches the receptor site. Something to that effect and it doesn't work at all. In fact, I'll tell you that after that after that wreck, I had a doctor in the gym that was that was watching me hobble around in there and ask me about my pain levels. And I said, you know, look, I haven't been asleep two weeks.

Mark Rippetoe:
And he said, what are they... what did the doctor give you? I said he gave me nothing. He gave me Tylenol. He wanted me to take Tylenol and ibuprofen. And he said, well, you know, not there's there are other things that we can give you for that. And he wrote me a prescription for some Percodan. So I thought, well, you know, I've heard Percodan is pretty strong, you know, work pretty good. So I went home and took some Percodan that night and it didn't do a damn thing. Took two of them, didn't do anything. If I remember correctly, laid awake. Reading all night because it's just that kind of pain. You can't relax, go to sleep.

Mark Rippetoe:
So I brought the things back in the next day and in fact, he wasn't there the next day, so I had two days that I tried this Percodan. So what? The next night I took three Percodan and drank about a half bottle of wine. And this is supposed to kill you, you know? And nothing happened. Read all night, just laid awake reading.

Mark Rippetoe:
Next day, I showed back up and I brought the bottle in. I said, "Did they fill this right?" And he looked at it and said, "Yeah, that's Percodan." I said, well, this is what I did and describe the previous night. Last night. He said, well, that's that's interesting. They make stronger stuff, you know. And he wrote me a prescription for six count of Dilaudid.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, Dilaudid at the time was seventy five dollars apiece on the street. And it is regarded as a drug of abuse. So it was a triplicate prescription form. I had to I had to take down -- one pharmacy in town that stocked it. I took it over to the pharmacy and they checked my I.D. and made a phone call or something and filled a prescription for six count of Dilaudid. So I thought, man, I'm going to actually get to sleep tonight.

Mark Rippetoe:
So I went home and I I took a Dilaudid. And I waited for 30 minutes and nothing happened and I took another Dilaudid and nothing happened. So I took a third Dilaudid. This is all within about an hour and 15 minutes. I took a third Dilaudid and part of a great big iced tea glass full of wine. And laid there and read the whole time.

Mark Rippetoe:
Not only was I not out of pain, I wasn't even sleepy. It didn't.. it had absolutely no effect on me. And, you know, you can choose to believe this or not, but I'm telling you, I had to head what was suppose to be a fatal dose of Dilaudid and alcohol. And it didn't do a damn thing to me.

Mark Rippetoe:
So the question is, what happens if I get burned up in a fire? What are they going to do to get me out of pain? Nothing. They put me to sleep, I guess. I don't know what else they do.

Mark Rippetoe:
But so I'm in kind of a shitty situation as far as it's concerned. I was laying up there in the hospital after the surgery. I remember being in it was I was in the room and it was two days after the surgery. I was in the hospital total four days. For some reason, they wouldn't do that now. This is 94. So I was in there for. This is on the probably the second night my parents had come up to see me and I was laying there in the bed and my mother and dad are at the end of the bed and. The pain was so bad, I remember that I was, I guess, in what you'd have to describe as a convulsion.

Mark Rippetoe:
I was shaking uncontrollably, my teeth were planted together and I couldn't talk. Sounds like a seizure might have been a little baby seizure. I don't know, I don't remember any psychological effects, but it was it was real bad.

Mark Rippetoe:
And. So finally, a nurse came in and said, oh, shit, and went down to the station, got a cc of Toradol, which is actually an NSAID, an injectable NSAID, and ran back down the hall and rolled me over and put this cc of Toradol in my ass. And about 30 seconds later, everything was much better. It's amazing how fast that stuff works. And it's not. And it's not an opiate. But it's got some weird ass mechanism of action. They put it in IM and it works immediately. And I came out of the convulsion and I didn't feel perfect, but I was like night and day.

Mark Rippetoe:
So the upshot of that story is it was real bad. It was it was real bad pain. It was real bad. It was horrible surgeries, a bad wreck. I mean, people have had a lot worse wrecks than that. And I understand that. I understand people who had arms and legs broken in multiple places. And thank God I've never had anything like that happen to me. But this was that was just the level of pain.

Mark Rippetoe:
I've mentioned this because when somebody comes in the gym and says and I'm in a lot of pain. You know, my knee hurt real bad. I noticed that their heart rate is normal and they're able to talk and everything said, would you rate your pain on a scale of one to 10? And they say "Seven or eight anyway." Just in a perfectly calm, clear voice. Seven or eight.

Mark Rippetoe:
It's just like RPE. The pain scale is complete bullshit too.

Mark Rippetoe:
Okay, now that was the worst injury thing.

Mark Rippetoe:
Okay. Next. This is always good. Benjamin Cook asks, "Has Mark Rippetoe considered doing the Joe Rogan podcast?" Oh, look, guys, I get so tired of hearing this. Look, Joe calls me every week. He calls me every week and I've been turning him down because I don't want to go to California. I don't like California, he does all of his podcasts in California, you've got to go out there. You got to put these headphones on. You know? And sit across the table and talk to these guys and I...

Mark Rippetoe:
You know, I look I've invited him out here, he said, "No, Rip, I want you to come to. I want you to come. I really, really want you to come to California." And no, Joe, call me next week and we'll talk about it some more. Let me think about it some more. Okay, out. I'll call you next week. And he calls me following week, and I just you know, this has been going on now for what? A couple of years.

Mark Rippetoe:
How many times have you taken a call from Joe?

[off-camera]:
I'm tired of talking to him.

Mark Rippetoe:
Your tired of talking to him too. We're all tired of it, you know, so I don't know. You think I ought to do it? I mean, I don't I don't see the point.

[off-camera]:
If it'll shut him up.

Mark Rippetoe:
If it'll shut him up, if it'll get him to understand that if you add five pounds to your squat, you'd be better on the mat. But I don't know that it will.

[off-camera]:
I think you should play hard to get.

Mark Rippetoe:
Well, you know, I've been I've been playing hard to get, but I hadn't been playing it that way. I'm not playing hard to get. I don't want to do the show. OK. Now, if I wanted to do the show. All right. And I kept telling him no, then I'd be playing hard to get, but I honestly, Bre, I don't want to talk to the guy on t... on the on the podcast.

Mark Rippetoe:
Look, I understand that Joe Rogan gets more views than any network television show on his weekly podcast. I understand all this.

[off-camera]:
He's super-entertaining.

Mark Rippetoe:
He's super-entertaining. Everybody loves him. An idiot would turn Joe down. But I guess I'm an idiot. I guess I'm an idiot. I just don't want to do it.

[off-camera]:
I haven't watched him.

Mark Rippetoe:
You haven't watched Joe? What? What? Well, she's. She's kidding.

[off-camera]:
There you go, Rip. You got to get on it just so she'll watch it.

Mark Rippetoe:
Just so she'll watch? I don't know. Let's talk about it later. He'll.. He's due to call in. Oh, he called while we're while we're talking. I missed his call. I got the ringer off.

Mark Rippetoe:
Missed him again. All right. Well, we'll see. But I don't know...I just...Joe Rogan. No, I just don't think so. I mean, really, no. OK.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now. All right. Here's one that I checked. For some reason, Nick, I think Nick is posting this from the YouTube comments because apparently the actual YouTube comment was illegible trash or something like that. What word? Nick is from the YouTube comments, highlighted comments? Scott Rogers. Forty six minutes ago, edited. What does all that mean? Do you have any idea what the hell he's talking about here? All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Well, I'll just read this. "I watched all of these SS back talks out of personal interest." I think he's referring to our discussions about back pain, all right. "Out of personal interest due to my own back pain. All of them, including with credentialed guests, are saying strengthening the muscles of the back makes pain go away. Not one of them addresses an equally important question. Can loading the spine and the inevitable micro breakdowns of form we all have in the gym accelerate structural degradation, degeneration in bone and cartilage and nuclei. Logically, it seems, yes. Haven't heard anything otherwise. And logic of physics compels a conclusion. Yes. Maybe strength training generates medium term alleviation. Maybe meet medium term, medium term alleviation through soft tissue fortification, but long term, potentially worse off as hard tissue grinds away under massive force. This glaring hole is demotivating to continue.".

Mark Rippetoe:
So this is a decent question. You know. I mean, at first glance, it does seem as though deadlifts would fuck your back up over time.

Mark Rippetoe:
OK. Let me let me start with saying that we have never said that strengthening the muscles of the back makes pain go away in every instance. Sometimes it does not. If you have degenerative changes in your lumbar spine that are sufficient enough to cause too much pain.

Mark Rippetoe:
What we have said is if you got chronic back pain and you haven't tried strength training, that usually squats and deadlifts will make the back pain go away. Usually. Not every single time. If you're 65 and your back's beenhurting you for 35 years, I would not expect your back pain to be completely eliminated by squats and deadlifts. What I would expect to happen is that it's it is significantly reduced.

In some cases, in most cases, actually, if you're experiencing low level chronic back pain when you start training squat in the deadlift, it goes away in two or three weeks. It actually does go away in two or three weeks. But that's not always the case. It's not always the case that this does completely eliminate back pain.

Mark Rippetoe:
The equation actually is this. Do you want. To have back pain and a weak back or do you want to have back pain and a strong back?

Mark Rippetoe:
You want a strong back. Because a strong back is less likely to hurt and less likely to be more... turther injured, then a weak back. So that's that's actually the equation. It's been our experience that the majority of the time back pain does in fact go away when you start to train. But it doesn't happen every single time. There's no guarantee that it's going to.

Mark Rippetoe:
But the other question here is interesting. "Not one of them addresses an equally important question: can loading the spine and inevitable microbreakdowns of form we all have in the gym accelerate... accelerate the structural degeneration in bone and cartilage."

Mark Rippetoe:
This is not an engineering problem. OK. We're dealing with a physiologic system that adapts to stress. Adaptation to stress is the primary reason we do this kind of training. We apply a stress to the system. The physiology of the system causes an adaptation to the stress. And then we apply a little bit more stress and an increased adaptation occurs.

Mark Rippetoe:
And by using this process over and over and over, we accumulate an adaptation that produces better fitness for the organism, better strength, better ability to adapt to the organisms environment. In this case, it's you get stronger. OK.

Mark Rippetoe:
Micro trauma, micro breakdowns of form produces trauma in in the back. Trauma is probably not the right word, it produces a structural strain within the within the back and that that stress that produces the strain. Response to that occurs and adaptation occurs to it. Your back gets stronger, the muscles get stronger, the ligaments get thicker, the bones get denser, the cartilage gets thicker and stronger and more resilient.

Mark Rippetoe:
And this process happens fairly quickly, and this is why most people get rid of their low level back pain in two, three weeks. It doesn't take very long for this to take place. Now, if you have had a whole bunch of motorcycle wrecks or even one bad motorcycle wreck, you've been bucked off a bunch of horses, you've done a bunch of other stupid shit that is hard on a person's back that doesn't have anything to do with your training.

Mark Rippetoe:
I'll be the first one to admit that my back hurts most of the time these days. Didn't used to do that, but as I've gotten older, my back hurts most of the time. My famous leaning on things is largely the result of my involuntary desire to take some weight off my back. And and because it hurts all the time, I'm not gonna blame my training. Although I've done a lot of stupid wrong things in my training, alot of which have resulted in me learning how to do things correctly. And if.... and in telling you the things that you need to know to not do what I've done and fuck your back up and everything.

Mark Rippetoe:
My knees are certainly not in the best shape either because I squatted wrong for years and years. And as a result of that, when I tell you how to squat the new way, do it like that so your knees don't hurt all the time. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
But I've been beat up real bad a bunch and my back hurts and my knees hurt. And, you know, there reaches a level of of abuse that you can't recover from. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
So. If you find that you can't tolerate the pain of training, that you can't tolerate the soreness, that's the result of the aftermath of bit of a workout that you can't tolerate that. Then quit. Right. If you'd rather be weak, I understand if you're if your pain tolerance is such that you can't deal with the pain of training, the pain of soreness. And the pain of of aging. Then tt may make sense to you, although it doesn't to me, to take the pain of training and the pain of soreness away so that all that is left is the general background pain that you're already experiencing.

Mark Rippetoe:
But I want to tell you: that's not the smartest thing for you to do. The smartest thing for you to do is get stronger. It'll be better if you're stronger. Even if it didn't completely eliminate your pain, being stronger is better. And those of you that have gone through this process and are now stronger, even though you're still in pain, know exactly what I'm talking about.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right, now, what are the comments from the haters gonna say? Bre, you'll be ready to obtain these words. And next time we do a Q & A we'll read all of what you're typing right now.

Mark Rippetoe:
"Rip's a broken down old fuck. He's telling everybody to deadlift and squat, he's crippled, he can't run. He doesn't care about RPE."

[off-camera]:
That's the height of the height...that's the height of callousness. Do not care about...

[off-camera]:
Lack of apathy.

Mark Rippetoe:
It's a lack of empathy.

[off-camera]:
Empathy.

Mark Rippetoe:
A lack of empathy. Right. That's what it. That's what it is.

Mark Rippetoe:
Look, if if you don't want to train, don't train, all right. "This is demotivating." If it demotivates you to to just consider the possibility that you're tearing your back up with deadlifts and you don't have any experience doing it, so you really understand that's not what's going on here at all. Then quit training.

Mark Rippetoe:
This isn't for everybody. Not everybody needs to train. Not everybody needs to succeed. Not everybody ought to have a beautiful wife. Not everybody earns a lot of money. Not everybody does well. Some people are pieces of shit. They just are. They can't help themselves. Some people are liars, cheats and scoundrels, thieves and and some people are just not meant to reap the benefits of training. And if that's you, don't train. Don't train and don't watch me. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now. Scott Beall asks, our friend from Denver, "Did you ever find the guy that killed your dog?" No, Scott, I didn't.

Mark Rippetoe:
This happened six or seven years ago. My little girl dog Ursa got shot and her little buddy Alfred, who was with her at the time, got shot, too. He survived. He just got shot through the skin of the withers. But little Ursa never came home. And no, I haven't found who did that.

Mark Rippetoe:
And you better hope I don't. I'm not a Christian. And I don't forgive.

Mark Rippetoe:
DanM says, "We understand sprinting and standing vertical jump capabilities are largely genetic." That's true, they are. "My question is if Starting Strength could do anything to improve sprint times, sprint times and SVJ" standing vertical jump.

Mark Rippetoe:
Yes, it can. Now, just because the genetic capacity for explosiveness. Is is kind of not terribly mutable doesn't mean it's completely immutable and certainly sprint at times are in fact mutable.

Mark Rippetoe:
Let's let's get the standing vertical jump over with. All right. First, our friends out at Sacramento State, Nessland and diStasio have coached this program at the college level for quite some time and they're reporting quite a bit better results with standing vertical jump changes over 3 or four years than anybody else. We've heard they're talking about 20, maybe 22, 23, 24 percent increases in standing, vertical jump.

Mark Rippetoe:
And this is a result of an exceptionally. Effective strength and conditioning program based on squats, deadlifts presses. Bench presses, cleans, snatches, the sort of thing. Correctly applied strength and conditioning program. College age males. These are guys these guys are getting real good results out there. All right. And according to them, the the the majority of that improvement is due to the fact that their squats and deadlifts have made their hips and legs stronger.

Mark Rippetoe:
They are the exception. Most strength conditioning programs are are not capable of producing extremely amazing significant changes in standing vertical jump because standing vertical jump, as we've discussed many times, is a window into the genetic capacity for motor unit recruitment in a very short period of time. This is explosion defined and in this there is a genetic difference between a guy with an 18 inch vertical jump and a 36 inch vertical jump and never the two shall meet. You cannot train a guy with an 18 inch vertical to a 36. You can't even train a guy with an 18 inch vertical to a 22 inch vertical. It doesn't occur anywhere except on the Internet. Ok.

Mark Rippetoe:
That having been said, any improvements in standing vertical jump are probably attributable primarily to a strength increase. They're not really attributable to practice because that standard vertical jump is such a good test because you can't game the name thing. You to learn how to do standing vertical jump. There's no technique to it. You know, beyond the first eight or 10 reps of of of practice jumps. You're going to learn what you need to do about how to perform a standing vertical jump within ten minutes of messing around with it. OK. So if the ECJ goes up, then you probably got strong. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Sprint times are a different thing entirely. It is it is a common thing among younger kids who have not been training at all. Fourteen year old boys, completely untrained 14 year old boys, we time these kids in a 40 yard dash. All right. And then we train them on the on the squat in the deadlift for three weeks and we take them back out on the track and we time them again and they've dropped a second. A whole second, second and a half off their 40.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now. This is an important phenomenon that that you need to understand. Ok. I think that this thing is almost entirely attributable to low back strength. It's not attributable to sprint mechanics instruction because I don't know how to do that and I haven't bothered with it because of the effectiveness of a strength improvement on reducing a sprint time.

Mark Rippetoe:
If you look at the low back and you look at the normal lordotic arch in the low back and you look at the musculature of the low back and the abs and all the muscles of the hip girdle that support the lordotic arch. You'll remember you...you'll understand then hat as you sprint down the track, as you ramp down the track, you'll understand that each stride that results in a hip extension is what pulls you down the track. A series of hip extensions, unilateral hip extensions, hard as you can go, as much force as you can push the track with to propel your body's mass down the track.

Mark Rippetoe:
And if you look at the low back's role in this, you'll understand why this is. It's not terribly difficult to see that if your low back muscles, your spinal rectors, get hard and strong more of the force with which you are performing the hip extension gets channelled into propelling your body's mass down the track and less of it gets eaten up in lumbar flexion.

Mark Rippetoe:
If your lumber flexes and relaxes every stride, how much of the hip extension gets eaten up by that? You can see the anatomy situation there. And if it gets eaten up in that, then you take maybe 10, 15 degrees of effective force transmission out of the hip extension with every stride. Whereas if you get your deadlift strong - and I'm not talking about, you know, a 700 deadlift, I'm talking about an untrained kid going from not deadlift anything to 135. You know, something we can do in three weeks.

Mark Rippetoe:
Then you see that that one little minor improvement in in mechanical strength for the sprint is responsible for a huge amount of efficiency improvement in sprints.

Mark Rippetoe:
Ok, now higher level sprinters know this. They all are very strong one way or another. They're very strong.

Mark Rippetoe:
And if you want to make a sprint time, go down, spend some time training your low back, spend some time squatting and deadlifting and you'll see exactly what I'm talking about. This works every time it's tried. Give it a shot.

Now, here's... this probably last one we have time for. You guys are trying your patience, I know. But let's see this last question here. "Hi, Rip. What's your advice for dealing with muscle cramps? I've been prone to cramping my whole life and I never could figure out if it was an issue with hydration, nutrition fatigue or something else. When I was younger, I played a lot of soccer, did a lot of running. You get cramps in my hamstrings and calves the next day. Now I'm in my mid thirties. I mostly lift weights and hardly run. I still get cramps in my hamstrings and now I also get cramps in my abs, which is particularly painful, sometimes in my lats. Any advice?

Mark Rippetoe:
Yeah, I. You know, early part of my lifting career when I was in my 20s, I was moving yards in Texas in the summer and still training. And I learned quickly how to deal with cramps. And this is what I have found about cramps. Cramps are a combination of the effects of dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. So hydration is easy. Drink a lot of fluid. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Water's fine. Iced tea is fine. Hell Diet Cokes are water.

Mark Rippetoe:
You know, I remember hearing a long time ago "You wouldn't wash your car with a Coke, you wouldn't wash your car with a Diet Coke so why would you think that they would be good for hydration?".

Mark Rippetoe:
I don't know how you explain the function of the stomach to somebody like that. Just, you know, it's fluid, right. Now, bourbon's probably not a good way to hydrate. All right. But, you know, I mean beer hydrates you. You know, if you get too high a gravity a beer, you're going to have side effects from that hydration that may not contribute to athletic performance, but at least acutely.

Mark Rippetoe:
But, you know, hydration is important. Yes. It's interesting that the rise of the bottled water industry has coincided with people thinking they need to drink a sip of water every five minutes. Frequent sips of water. I love it when I say it like that. Frequent sips of water. Just look, just get a big glass of water, drink the goddamn thing. And then next time you're thirsty, get another big glass of water and drink the goddamn thing. People come to our seminar with a gallon of water they keep on the table. It's so weird. So [mimics drinkng] every five minutes?

Mark Rippetoe:
I don't understand how they think... well, they haven't thought, but... how the human thirst response is somehow suddenly inadequate in 2019 to to provide you with information that you need about hydration.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. It is. It's just fine. Just drinking a bunch of water. I drink, what, four times a day? Not thirsty right now. You notice how I have stayed out of this coffee?

Mark Rippetoe:
I'm not thirsty. And I forget about it.

Mark Rippetoe:
But you people would have a bottle of water hear and continually interrupting the podcast with drinking a bottle of water. Don't do that. That's stupid.

Mark Rippetoe:
Just drink when you're thirsty. Drink a whole bunch. Get up thirsty and quit wasting time all through the day hydrating.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. That having been said, hydration is important in terms of cramps. The other thing is important is electrolytes. And this is what I have found works best. Get a bottle of potassium tablets there at the store. They're 99 milligrams apiece. They're cheap.

Mark Rippetoe:
And if hydration or cramping is a problem, take a big handful of those things during the course of the day. Everyday take eight or 10 of the things. Now, this is like the minimum daily requirement or whatever they call RDA. Now for potassium is about thirty five hundred milligrams a day. You take ten of those. It's less than 25 percent of your daily potassium intake, and if you're cramping, it may be that electrolyte, the other electrolytes are solved by taking a multiple mineral.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now there are multiple minerals built around the 1000 mg calcium, 500 mg magnesium structure, twice as much calcium as magnesium, and then a bunch of trace minerals in that take. Get a bottle of those. I buy them on Amazon. Take - if you're cramping - take for those for a couple of days and a handful of potassium and make sure your water levels - your thirst - is being addressed. In addition to the multiple minerals, if you make sure your thirst is being addressed and you're taking them, you know, potassium.

Mark Rippetoe:
I don't think you're gonna have a problem with cramps, because if you're having cramps, if you do what I'm telling you to do, they'll go away by tomorrow. If that doesn't fix them, I don't know. All right. Because at usual, every time I've had any problem with cramps, that's how I fixed it. It worked immediately. Everybody I've told to do this had their cramps go away immediately. So that's my advice.

Mark Rippetoe:
Handful of potassium tablets. Three or four multiple minerals for a couple of days in a row and then Tuesday from then on. Make sure you're hydrated and that should take care of your cramps. Give it a try. Let me know.

Mark Rippetoe:
So I think we probably need to shut up and go away. Thanks for joining us on Starting Strength Radio. We will see you next time.

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Mark Rippetoe answers questions from Starting Strength Radio fans. Topics include online coaching, Rip's injuries, hypertrophy training, and the Joe Rogan Podcast.

  • 00:00 Intro
  • 01:31 Comments from the Haters
  • 06:16 Q&A intro
  • 06:41 Online coaching - limitations, workarounds, camera angles, bar path
  • 17:27 Is volume the primary driver of hypertrophy? - Lyle McDonald, The Novice Effect
  • 25:01 Training after knee/hip replacements - Getting joint replacements so you can train
  • 34:10 Training non-human animals for strength?
  • 36:02 Oh, Canada! 39:13 What is the worst injury you've ever had?
  • 49:42 Is Rip considering Joe Rogan's podcast?
  • 52:31 What about long term effects of training on back pain?
  • 1:03:07 Did you ever find the guy that killed your dog?
  • 1:03:58 Can SS improve sprint times & SVJ?
  • 1:11:20 Advice for problems with cramping

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