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Rippetoe Clears Up Common Misconceptions | Starting Strength Radio #25

Mark Rippetoe | October 11, 2019

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Mark Rippetoe:
I don't fucking know.

[off-camera]:
I think it's the warrior. Pretty sure that's the warrior.

Mark Rippetoe:
What's it called? The warrior?

[off-camera]:
Warrior.

Mark Rippetoe:
Where you're...

[off-camera]:
Yeah, that's it. That's...I love it.

Mark Rippetoe:
And the back hand is always doing something.

Mark Wulfe:
From The Aasgaard Company Studios in beautiful Wichita Falls, Texas... From the finest mind in the modern fitness industry... The one true voice of the strength & conditioning profession... The most important podcast on the internet... Ladies and gentlemen! Starting Strength Radio.

Mark Rippetoe:
Welcome back to Starting Strength Radio. Thank you, Mark Wulfe, for the fabulous introduction. Always appreciate his work here at The Aasgaard Company.

Mark Rippetoe:
Today's show is going to be kind of a kind of a modified version of the Q&A. We are going to talk about common misconceptions about fitness. And I know you'll be looking forward to that on the other side of...

Mark Rippetoe:
Comments from the Haters!

Mark Rippetoe:
Today was very productive. We had lots of haters over the past three or four days.

Mark Rippetoe:
Bathroom critic - which perfectly sums up his qualifications for making these observations: "I have never seen somebody work so hard to hike their foot up."

Mark Rippetoe:
Remember when I put my foot up on the...to show somebody what a boot was. What the hell was that all about?

[off-camera]:
I thought you did pretty effortlessly.

Mark Rippetoe:
Look at that. That's my Jesus boot today.

Mark Rippetoe:
Yeah, that was that was quite a bit of... quite a bit of effort wasn't it.

[off-camera]:
We're going to get feet comments now.

Mark Rippetoe:
Feet comments. About my fungus under my big toenail.

[off-camera]:
There are going to be people trying to buy your feet pictures.

Mark Rippetoe:
Be people selling them. People selling my feet pictures on the internet.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right, this Severian213. Has he already been on once? Severian...you don't remember that name? "Why don't you guys stop pretending that you know how to get strong? The only thing that Mark Grip a hoe can pull is a blind hooker whose rent is due."

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, there's a thoughtful comment.

[off-camera]:
It's a pretty good rip.

Mark Rippetoe:
This keeps coming up. "What's with the weird twitchy hand syndrome?" I don't know what he's talking about. "Like spasmodically pinching lobster claws. Ummm...that sounds tasty."

Mark Rippetoe:
"Mark 'lardass' Rippetoe father of Permabulking." This is Mamtuddin Banerjul Talwe Mussalmanki Chaato. You know what that is?

[off-camera]:
I have no idea.

Mark Rippetoe:
That's racism is what that is. Someone is making fun of a third world person's name. That's racism.

[off-camera]:
Tragedy.

Mark Rippetoe:
That's racism.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. Let's see.

Mark Rippetoe:
"I see Mark on the right there has taken comments" and I'm currently sitting next to Santana here "I see Mark on the right there is taking Comments from the Haters to heart and lost some weight."

[off-camera]:
You want to know what it is? It's the skeleton.

Mark Rippetoe:
What?

[off-camera]:
Talking about the skeleton in the background. In that video.

Mark Rippetoe:
Yeah? What are you talking about? What the hell are you talking about?

[off-camera]:
Santana's video.

Mark Rippetoe:
Oh, Santana's video. Oh, they're talking about Santana's video. They're not talking about me actually losing weight because I was about to be extremely... I was about to be offended by that. Few of these things cut to the quick, but me losing weight. That's unnecessary. I don't... Don't type that shit.

[off-camera]:
Are they talking about our poor skeleton's eating disorder?

Mark Rippetoe:
Apparently they are.

[off-camera]:
He's trying, all right.

Mark Rippetoe:
He's trying his best. "Hey, I try to eat more," said the skeleton. "I try to eat more. I eat as much as I can. I'm trying to eat more."

Mark Rippetoe:
Oh, God.

Mark Rippetoe:
And let's see. "Got an ad for clothing that hides fat peoples [sic] rolls before this video." Some dumb ass said that.

Mark Rippetoe:
Here's one in relation to the weightlifting belt. Somebody named BrapHog says, "Rip needs the belt to keep those juicy titties tied down."

Mark Rippetoe:
Isn't that amazing? That's probably the same guy that always fascinated by my nipples. Right. It's got to be.

Mark Rippetoe:
And that's Comments from the Haters!

Mark Rippetoe:
Now back to business. One of our brilliant executive producers, Ray Gillenwater, Ray Gillencheeser as we sometimes refer to him. Ray Cheesenwater. What else can we do with that? Ray Hickenlooper. No, that's a Democratic politician from Colorado.

Mark Rippetoe:
Ray Gillenwater has come up with an idea for the show today. And I kind of liked it. It was the common misconceptions and fitness. And I thought, well, we could do about nine hours on that. But I think what we'll do is just knock the top off of it today and deal with some of the first things that just came to everyone's mind. All right. In no particular order... Let's just dive into this shall we?

Mark Rippetoe:
Run to lose bodyfat. The idea that running is what makes you lose bodyfat. That's a very persistent misconception. If that were true, then nobody that runs would be fat. And it's been my experience that lots and lots of people who run are fat.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, if you get up to where you're running 60 miles a week or something like that, you know, 60 miles a week does not leave time for eating. And those people tend to be highly motivated, competitive runners. They're liable to be vegans or something like that. That, you know, where where... they're not only are running 60 miles a week, they're working around an eating disorder too. Those people are not going to be of normal bodyweight. So, yeah, they're going to be skinny. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
But running to lose bodyweight does not work if you're approaching it in a sane way, like you're running two or three miles, twice a week, three times a week. That's not going to be enough calories burned to make you lose a bunch of bodyfat.

Mark Rippetoe:
Running probably burns a total of one hundred and fifty calories an hour.

[off-camera]:
I just looked up. Yeah. A quarter-pounder with cheese, 260 calories on average.

Mark Rippetoe:
A quarterpounder with cheese is more than 260 calories. I don't believe that.

[off-camera]:
It's probably more. But to run a 100 calories off, you'd have to run a 10 minute mile.

Mark Rippetoe:
One 10 minute mile.

[off-camera]:
One 10 minute mile for one hundred calories.

Mark Rippetoe:
Right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Well, that's that's, you know, probably about right. It's somewhere in there, especially if you've been running any length of time and are good enough at it to to run economically. And by running economically, I mean someone that knows how to run without just flailing around and expending a bunch of energy doing it.

Mark Rippetoe:
People have this idea that running is extremely consumptive of calories and it's not. If you run, it's not. You get better at running. And by getting better at running what happens is you get more efficient at running, burning fewer calories. That's what better at running would be.

Mark Rippetoe:
And even if you go faster, the the increase in caloric expenditure is not significant enough to make a great big giant difference in your bodyfat levels. A pound of bodyfat is about 3000 calories. Thirty five hundred calories, maybe. I've seen varying estimates. Now that's a hell of a bunch of miles to be running.

Mark Rippetoe:
And for every body over the age of 18. OK. And and why this works better for young people, I'm not quite sure, but it's just I noticed this myself when I got a little older. You cannot run off bodyfat. Absolutely not. Can't be done. There's not anybody on earth that is a diet consulting professional will tell you that that cardio, aerobics, spin class, jogging, running, elliptical, treadmill, riding a bike - all this long, slow distance that everybody's always doing. That's not how you lose bodyfat. If you are fat and you need to lose bodyfat, it requires a dietary manipulation. There's no way around it.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, there's a bunch of people who advocate - and these are professionals, people that help bodybuilders get ready for a show - that will advocate doing 30 to 45 minutes worth of stationary bike or or jogging or something in the morning before you eat.

Mark Rippetoe:
I don't know what effect that has. That's not my end of the business. I don't know. But the math tells you that if you intend to continue to train, we're assuming that you're training here, that if you're going to run a sane amount, it's not going to be effective in terms of helping you drop bodyfat. You have to manipulate your diet. There's no other intervention that's going to work for them.

Mark Rippetoe:
Ok, now here's another popular misconception. Lifting causes high blood pressure.

Mark Rippetoe:
No, it doesn't.

Mark Rippetoe:
That's not even a logical. Why would you think that lifting causes high blood pressure? I mean, if you're... there's no other way to get in shape, I mean, get strong, besides lifting weights. Can't get strong if you're not lifting weights. Are you saying everybody's that's strong from lifting weights has high blood pressure? That certainly as hell not the case.

Mark Rippetoe:
Is it the idea perhaps that during a heavy rep? Say a heavy squat, heavy deadlift. Your blood pressure spikes during that rep? Which it does, and you adapt to that by getting better at dealing with a high blood pressure, a transient acute high blood pressure spike, but a transient acute high blood pressure spike goes away. And the system relaxes immediately after the rep.

Mark Rippetoe:
And because you have been exposed to a transient acute blood pressure... blood pressure spike, does not mean you're going to retain high blood pressure. If anything, what it means is that if you are exposed to transient, acute high blood pressure spikes, your vascular bed gets more adapted to high blood pressure.

Mark Rippetoe:
If you lift weights and are in good shape and are strong from lifting weights, lift and heavy weights, your blood pressure will not elevate. You do not have hypertension from lifting weights. You do not get hypertension from lifting weights. Hypertension comes from other things. It comes from inactivity. It comes from bad genetics. It comes from things that people who are strong from lifting weights don't do like sitting around on their ass. That's how you get hypertension.

Mark Rippetoe:
Lifting weights does not produce hypertension, and there's no evidence that it does. There is no evidence that lifting weights produces high blood pressure. None. There is no evidence in the literature. It does not occur. So get this out of your head. That is a misconception. And it's stupid. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, procedural questions - to make faster progress train more days per week. To make faster progress, do more exercises each day.

Mark Rippetoe:
Ok. What do you mean by progress? If you mean getting stronger which is our emphasis and a side effect of getting stronger hypertrophy, bigger muscles. What you are going to make the best progress from doing is going to be that which makes you strongest, fastest.

Mark Rippetoe:
More volume, more training volume, more days a week, more exercises, more exercise - variety is not what makes you strong. What makes you strong is stressing the system systemically by doing squats, presses, bench presses, deadlifts and then repeating that process over a time interval that is the most effective at producing the stress recovery adaptation response.

Mark Rippetoe:
And what experience has shown us is that for a person who's never trained before, about 48 hours, 48-72 hours between exposures to that kind of stress is what produces the best and the fastest progress. Doing more days a week is directly anathema to that idea. You stress the body optimally with exercises that put the most stress on the most amount of muscle tissue over the longest effective range of motion using progressively heavier weights. And you do that on a schedule that produces the most consistent long term progress over time. And that boils down to 48-72 hours between workouts.

Mark Rippetoe:
And what that looks like in real time is a Monday, Wednesday, Friday training program. The exercises we use, as I mentioned, are the squat, the press, the bench, press, deadlift. We use power cleans, power snatches. We do some chins along with that. And on that three day schedule - Monday/Wednesday/Friday - take 72 hours on the weekend instead of 48. This is what makes the best progress and hundreds and hundreds of thousands of people having done it like that have shown us exactly what you need to know. And that's not training every day, especially if you're a novice. You train the whole body. You rest for 48 hours, train the whole body again, rest for 48 hours, train the whole body again, rest for 72 hours just in case you accumulated a little fatigue. That gives you an extra day to recover.

Mark Rippetoe:
And a schedule like that Monday/Wednesday/Friday is what produces the most rapid, consistent progress for a long period of time. You can go six months uninterrupted, not missing any workouts and gain a lot of muscular body . Double, double and a half, triple your squat or deadlift, double your bench press, double your press in that period of time.

Mark Rippetoe:
If you double, double and a half, triple your deadlift, squat, press, bench press, guess what happens to your muscles? They get bigger. All right. In programming for strength, you're also programming for size. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, if you fall back on all this discredited exercise physiology research that says that four to five sets of eight to ten reps of fifteen or twenty thousand different exercises done over the course of a week are what produces the best results. That's bullshit. It doesn't work.

Mark Rippetoe:
I don't care what the study says, it's wrong. Every one of those studies has glaring methodology flaws, and I'm not even interested in discussing it. We know what works because this is what we do for a living. Do what we say. OK.

Mark Rippetoe:
Let's see. A variety of exercises are needed to make sure every body part is trained. This is common. This is extremely common. It goes back to what we just addressed.

Mark Rippetoe:
If you select the general, large, structural barbell exercises like squats, deadlifts, presses and bench pressess, and you select them on the basis of their performance tailored to involve as much muscle mass over a longer, the longest effective range of motion lifting the heaviest weight, then you have involved all of the muscles of the body.

Mark Rippetoe:
We were talking about this Sunday afternoon. Your calves are working very, very hard in a squat and in the deadlift. Now, you don't know that because they don't get sore, but soreness and working hard are two completely different things.

Mark Rippetoe:
Soreness and the perception of soreness means that you did a bunch of eccentric work to which you were not adapted. That's all it means. Soreness does not ensure muscle growth. Absolutely it does not. It is possible to go six months on an novice linear progression and get sore about three times. The first two or three workouts you will get sore. The rest of it does not produce even noticeable amounts of soreness while at the same time your squat is going up pounds a workout, your deadlift's going up, five pounds a workout. You're getting stronger every single week. Soreness not being a factor.

Mark Rippetoe:
So training for soreness is not the same thing as training for stress. Training for soreness is, oh, atonement. Absolution. You know, self-flagellation, these sorts of things. You've got some psychological debt you're trying to pay.

Mark Rippetoe:
If you're just trying to be sore all the time, you're not looking at this process clearly. A variety of exercises only ensures that you're going to get sore. All right. And soreness is not a factor in the production of strength. Going up five pounds on your squat every workout is the primary factor in the production of strength. Lifting more weight is what makes you stronger.

[off-camera]:
But don't you have to confuse muscles?

Mark Rippetoe:
Muscle confusion results from the idea that exercise variety is a factor. Now let's look back. The squat involves everything in the body under the bar because you're going to squat down, your going to stand back up, including your calves. All right. People think you have to do calf raises to work your calves.

Mark Rippetoe:
No, no, that's not what happens. You don't need to do calves. And during the course of taking a 155 pound kid up to 205, his calves are going to grow an inch, inch and a half during that process without doing any calves because the squat works everything. If you couple the squat with the deadlift, with the overhead press and with the bench press and then you chin and you do your cleans, every muscle group, every muscle belly in the body gets work. You may not be aware of it because they're not sore. That didn't mean they're not working.

Mark Rippetoe:
And if you want to understand how your calves work when you're squatting and deadlifting, all you need to do is rupture an Achilles tendon. And I assure you you will become aware of things that you were not aware of before about what your calves do when you train.

Mark Rippetoe:
Oh, really. I mean, you could I guess you could rupture the Achilles tendon just as an experiment. You know WHAM! with your knife, you know. Just so you'll know, just so you'll know, what I'm telling you is true. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
So no, variety of exercises is designed to produce soreness. If the program is being sold on the basis of soreness like P90X, CrossFit, all these muscle confusion things, soreness is an immediate gratification thing that people can learn to associate with with exercising, all right, but soreness is not a factor in training.

Mark Rippetoe:
We've discussed the difference between training and exercise many times. Excellent article on our website called The Two Factor Model of Sports Performance. I suggest you read it and you'll see what I'm talking about. If you're interested in being sore and that's all you're interested in, is some kind of proof, some kind of validation of what you're doing that afternoon is productive, then you're exercising and you're not training. We're here to train. Ok.

Mark Rippetoe:
Lets see. Eat keto or Paleo to stay lean. Eat less to stay lean.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, if Paleo or keto helps you eat less than do it. One of the most profound effects of eating keto, you know a very low carb diet, is the fact that you're not hungry anymore. After three or four days, your sense of hunger goes away. You'll forget to eat because you're just not hungry. Blood sugar gets low and stays low. Blood sugar variations seem to be the thing that drives appetite. And if you keep your blood sugar low all the time, you're not going to have any spikes in appetite. You're not going to feel hunger. And that is a tremendous help to some people with respect to eating less, because if you're not hungry, then the tendency to overeat is obviously not there.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, what we found is that if you're intending to train hard, it's real tough to do that on on a keto, ketogenic diet, a low carb diet. You've got to have some carbs to train. That's just all there is to it. If you're going to train hard three days a week, then you're going to have to get some carbs.

Mark Rippetoe:
If you're a sedentary person, the Atkins diet is a marvelous way to lose a whole bunch of bodyfat. It works pretty thoroughly every time it's tried if you'll do it correctly. But you can't train on Atkins. You can't do it. You're sore all the time. It just doesn't work. You don't have the energy to train. It's just the carbs are necessary for that type of training.

Mark Rippetoe:
So if you're training and you want to do a keto diet, you're going to have to have some carbs in along with it or you can't train. Which kind of probably makes it not keto. Paleo is probably a better choice for that. But then you get into, you know, the worship of different types of foods and the hatred of other types of foods. And it's just not you know, it's a big pain in the ass, produce psychological problems, makes you feel like you're a horrible individual if you have a cooked carrot, you know, that sort of thing. And I don't know how productive that is, but, you know, but again, I'm not the diet guy. You guys do what you want to do. I'm a fat guy. OK. As Comments from the Haters! demonstrates every week.

Mark Rippetoe:
So I'm not going to sit here and tell you how to stay lean because I don't really care. But I am aware of the fact that if your stay lean, you eat less and the way you eat less is going to depend on the way you best manage those circumstances. And if keto's the way you eat less, if paleo is the way you eat less...

Mark Rippetoe:
What are some of the other approaches to diet?

[off-camera]:
Cannibalism.

Mark Rippetoe:
Cannibalism is a marvelous way to lose weight because it's so difficult to obtain a decent. Now, you said cannibalism. It it's cannibalism is a form of carnivory, that's true. But man, here in North America, you want to lose much weight, become a cannibal. It's tough.

[off-camera]:
Hard to get by.

Mark Rippetoe:
Hard to get meat, you know, depending on where you are. You know, if you're in Chicago, it's, you know, fairly plentiful.

[off-camera]:
California.

Mark Rippetoe:
California, all the homeless. Do you know how easy it is to kill a homeless person and eat them right there on the sidewalk?

[off-camera]:
There's 81 thousand calories in the human body.

Mark Rippetoe:
Eighty one thousand calories. You could feed a whole block of homeless people within one homeless person. And I'm sure they're willing to give up one of themselves, you know. It's it's it's worth considering.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right, now. Lifting causes women to get bulky.

Mark Rippetoe:
Bulk. I like that word bulk. Get all bulked up.

[off-camera]:
I want to get toned.

Mark Rippetoe:
They want to sculpt long, lean muscle. No, not muscles. Muscle. Long, lean muscle. Muscle. I want to sculpt, long, lean muscle.

Mark Rippetoe:
Singular - muscle, because it is like sport. Sport. Getting in condition for sport.

Mark Rippetoe:
Oh god. People are just such pompous asses with their language and stuff.

Mark Rippetoe:
No, lifting doesn't cause women to get bulky, having the genetics for bulk causes women to get bulky. Some women - I don't know if you've noticed this - some women are bigger than other women. Some children are bigger than other children. Some people have bigger bones than other people. Some people have bigger muscles than other people. Some people put on fat more easily than other people. Some people respond to training very, very easily by growing muscle very fast.

Mark Rippetoe:
Those kind of people are going to get bulky from lifting weights. To which I would say whatat the hell's wrong with that? What is wrong with a muscular woman? You people aren't sexist, are you? I mean, to to be opposed to a big, muscular woman. I think is a that's the worst kind of sexual stereotyping that you could possibly engage in. It's anti-feminist, it's sexist, it's misogynist, and it's racist. So don't don't be that way. OK. Rise above that.

Mark Rippetoe:
Rise above that and stop being worried about getting big and muscular. If you are a woman who's big and muscular by nature, be proud of that.

Mark Rippetoe:
I'm proud of you. I like big, muscular women. A lot of guys in this, in in our line of work, like big, muscular women. We don't see anything wrong with it. You know why? Because we're not threatened by you. We're not threatened by you.

Mark Rippetoe:
Little beta fuckers, you know, walking around at 5'10" 160. Those are the kind of guys that are threatened by big, handsome, muscular, gorgeous women like you. They're threatened for obvious reasons. We're not, so hang around with us and be validated.

Mark Rippetoe:
Hey, don't need to say anything else about that? I think I made...

[off-camera]:
When I see a woman squat over 300, I'm like fuck yeah.

Mark Rippetoe:
That's so fucking cool. Three hundred squatter. You know, this worship of skinny is... that needs to stop. It really does. So I just I just disagree with your premise. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
And again, toning. All right, let me let me tell you where that word comes from. Toning, firming and toning to sculpt long, lean muscle. That is the women's fitness industry. There's a whole side of this industry that only deals with women. They're not as popular as they used to be but 30-40 years ago, there were women's exercise salons. There were salons where only women were allowed. Because, you know, women don't want men watching them while they work out.

Mark Rippetoe:
You know, and here again, here we are back to the sexist misogyny. You know, to make that generalization is kind of stupid. You know, not all women are that self-conscious and silly, you know. I guess there are still a subset of women that don't want men watching them while they work out. But, you know, we don't deal with those people. We're in the strength and conditioning business. We're not in....

[off-camera]:
Dudes go there to pick up women that just want to work out.

Mark Rippetoe:
Sure. Gold's Gym, 24 hour fitness. those things are really the bars of the 21st century, where you go to get laid. And I don't have a problem with that at all, but we're just in a different line of work. We're in here to train, get people strong. And that means that when the gym's open, everybody gets to come in.

Mark Rippetoe:
Which means that women get to come in, too, which means that you're somehow going to have to control your base or urges and leave them the fuck alone while they're training. OK. It also means that women are going to be responsible for not worrying about people looking at them. They're going to be responsible for the fifth rep of the set like everybody else is too. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
And and they've got to get over the idea that this is an appropriate time to be vain or self-conscious, because neither neither one of those emotional situations is is is a is useful in a strength training context. You're there to train. You're there to put five pounds on your squat and your deadlift. And your job is to not worry about anything else but that. And that's what we do when we train for strength. All the other considerations are ancillary.

Mark Rippetoe:
You're not of any concern to us, except that at some level they may be motivational if you're you know, because, you know, let's just face it, people are motivated by aesthetics, you know. I think that's that's true for every trainee at some level. The most successful trainees have made their aesthetic wishes and desires subservient to the the understanding that strength is the pathway to that. And so it doesn't matter what you look like, where you're when you're doing your five rep PR for Friday. What matters is that you get the fifth rep. And these are the kinds of things that you need to be concerned with if you're going to be effective in the gym.

Mark Rippetoe:
Tone. To address the previous thing here is toning and firming is a way to sell women's training. Tonus is the term that is used to describe the effect that exercise produces in a muscle whereby a random, very small number of motor units within the muscle group are firing all the time and a toned quote unquote muscle has a more firm feel to it because it's in a very partial state of contraction all the time. Women's fitness industry seized upon this and has decided that tone is fine, but bulk is is not okay. And they've successfully sold this bizarre concept to women. And it's unfortunate that women have been badly informed about this and have been become susceptible to these kinds of obvious sexist, misogynist advertising approaches to the women's fitness industry.

Mark Rippetoe:
It's... when I first started, for example, in the fitness business back in the 70s, the health spa I worked in was open to men Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday and to women Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. In other words, if you were a male, you couldn't train in the club Monday, Wednesday, Friday. You had to wait till Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday to train at the club because those were the men's days and Monday, Wednesday, Friday were the women's days and never the two shall meet except late at night in the hot tub.

Mark Rippetoe:
Oh, we had fun. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Anyway, I think that this toning idea that a lot of you've got is a persistent idea that's been planted in your little brains by the advertising people at the Globo gyms. I think you need to be informed about what strength and conditioning does to a women's physique, men's physique, and you need to be informed on it based on your individual genetic predisposition.

Mark Rippetoe:
If you're a big girl, you're gonna be a big girl. Can't help you with that. Nor would I want to because I like big girls. I like muscular women. A lot of other people like muscular women too.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, if you don't want to be muscular and you're headed in that direction because of your parents, then just sit down. You can be ashamed of yourself the rest of your life, if you want to. I don't recommend that because it's not psychologically healthy. I think you should be strong. I think you should be the strongest person you can ... you can be. And if that involves you having a little bit more impressive physique than your hundred and sixty pound beta boyfriend, get a better boyfriend, you know, get a better boyfriend. There's other ones. There's better guys. There really are.

[off-camera]:
Any time I've had a female client come in and say she wants to quote unquote tone. You know, it's really easy to cut to that real fast by saying, "So you want to burn fat and build muscle because that's exactly what you're talking about."

Mark Rippetoe:
Yeah. That's what she...that's what she needs. That's what she needs to think about doing. But she doesn't think about it like that. So you've got, as as the coach you have some education to do. And hopefully she's an intelligent enough client, a good enough client to understand what you're trying to explain to her.

Mark Rippetoe:
But she has an idea in her mind that was put there by somebody else. It was put there by somebody else. And it's not healthy and it's not accurate and it's false. And you have to help her past it.

[off-camera]:
And every client that I've had come to me with that. When they when they start training, when their body starts changing. Guess what? They like the changes.

Mark Rippetoe:
They usually they do. Usually they do. Because a suite of changes besides just, you know, thigh diameter is taking place. And if they're they're paying attention...

Mark Rippetoe:
I've had a couple a couple women quit over the years because I started them off on squats or I might have even started some of these people off on leg press because they weren't strong enough to do squats. And the first thing they noticed was their thighs got bigger. Well, their thighs have to get bigger because bigger thighs mean bigger thigh muscles and bigger thigh muscles mean more fat burning, greater basal metabolic rate. Increase basal metabolic rate, which is helpful in terms of overall body fat loss, but they couldn't deal with the initial progress of the first three weeks that made their thighs a little bigger and they weren't capable of processing past this.

Mark Rippetoe:
And in fairness, I might not have been capabile of explaining myself at the time. I might not have been capable of of describing exactly what was going to take place, what was taking place and what they could expect later on. But sometimes it's not my fault. Sometimes it's a client fault. Sometimes it won't be your fault. It'll be your clients fault.

Mark Rippetoe:
If you have a female training client, and she's not capable of thinking past the superficial stuff that she's been, you know, fed in the magazines... Oh, and the women's magazines. God. Oh, they're so horrible. They're just...anybody can write for those things. As you turn in an article on the deadline, they'll print the damn thing and it's just bullshit, you know. Hell the fitness magazines, you know, contribute to all this nonsense.

Mark Rippetoe:
And that's what we're talking to you. Common misconceptions, they are perpetuated by the media.

[off-camera]:
Well, you know, and you look at those cover models, all of them are airbrushed.

Mark Rippetoe:
Every one of the pictures on the cover of the magazine of an attractive female, the one you want to be, is airbrushed.

[off-camera]:
Airbrushed and any kind of performance enhancing drugs. They're all on them.

Mark Rippetoe:
Yes. They're all on PEDs.

[off-camera]:
And they want to sell that's the look.

Mark Rippetoe:
Oh, I hate to tell you guys that, but hat's that's certainly true.

Mark Rippetoe:
And here you are being sold this deceptive image. It's not realistic. It's not even desirable, really. You know, if your skinny boyfriend is threatened by your muscles... Once again, really - get another boyfriend. God almighty, God almighty. Don't date beta males. Don't do it. I know there aren't that many alphas around. But my god. Don't date beta males. That's not good for your brain.

Mark Rippetoe:
Okay. Now, yoga is important to stay loose and flexible. Well, why is it necessary to stay loose and flexible? I'm not arguing the fact that yoga will make you loose and flexible. I'm just asking you why. Why do you want to be loose and flexible? What is inherently better about being loose and flexible than about being about having tight, strong and therefore safer joints?

Mark Rippetoe:
Loose joints get injured. Tight, strong joints get injured at a far lower rate than hypermobile joints. Hypermobility is not a good thing. And you people are cultivating hypermobility with your yoga stuff, all right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Here's yoga. All right. All right. If you've got this pose, you're here. And behind me, there's rocks or a forest or the ocean or some shit and I'm out on a, you know, by myself out in the middle of absolute nowhere going...

[off-camera]:
What pose are you doing?

Mark Rippetoe:
I don't fucking know.

[off-camera]:
I think that's the Warrior. I'm pretty sure that's the Warrior.

Mark Rippetoe:
What's it called? The Warrior? Where you're...

[off-camera]:
Yeah, that's it. That's it.

Mark Rippetoe:
And the back end is always doing something, right? Well, that's yoga.

Mark Rippetoe:
And if you want to do that and it makes you, you know, happy to assume these poses, enjoy being in that position, you go ahead and get in that position. If you want to do it on a beach, you know, up in Washington state with nobody around you except the sea lions and the birds and shit, then go ahead. And it's beautiful. Makes for wonderful photography. Whatever that pose means. I don't know. I don't care. It's not something I'm interested in. I'm probably wrong about all this, I'm sure. But once again, it's just someone I care about. And if you want to yoga, go ahead and do yoga. I mean, yoga instructors gotta eat like everybody else does.

Mark Rippetoe:
OK, my question is, why do you need to be loose and flexible? How was it stated? Loose and flexible. I think the fitness community is selling people the idea that more flexible and a greater range of motion around a joint is always better than tight. And that's not true. That's absolutely not true.

[off-camera]:
I wish my knee wasn't flexible.

Mark Rippetoe:
stef's got problems with hypermobility. Her knees are just just hyper mobile. There's a situation called Marfan's Syndrome that is a actual connective tissue disorder. And I'm not saying that everybody with hypermobile joints has got Marfan syndrome, but there are people with Marfan syndrome that wish their joints were not as loose and mobile as they are.

Mark Rippetoe:
And the idea that we have to proceed every workout with 30 minutes of mobility work is an excellent way to waste 30 minutes as far as I'm concerned. But once again, you want to do yoga. You do yoga. You want to stretch and do mobility. You do stretching and mobility. Fine with me.

Mark Rippetoe:
I'm just telling you that it's probably not necessary. It's usually detrimental to joint stability and therefore the predisposition to injury. And it's a waste of time, we've got other things to be do. But if you enjoy doing it, like playing the lottery, you go right ahead. OK, fine with me.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now. Functional training makes you stronger.

Mark Rippetoe:
We've talked about functional training so many times. Let's define functional training. Functional training, I mean, it's one of these things where you know it when you see it. It's like obscenity, you know it when you see it. If there's chrome dumbbells, if they're are in stable... unstable surfaces like bosu balls, Swiss balls. If there exercises being done on the left side and not the right side and then on the right side, not the left side. Like one foot's up in the air and the other hand's up in the air and you're dancing around, you know, in the floor in unstable circumstances and producing extremely low force movements, that's functional training. Once again, it's like obscenity. You know it when you see it. It's hard to define though, right?

Mark Rippetoe:
And it's intentionally hard to define. It's functional. What does functional mean? Well its.. to me, functional means an exercise that is performed in a way that produces an adaptation that increases the function of the organism. All right. So to me, a functional exercise is a squat or a deadlift or a press. That's functional because it improves the function of the organism.

Mark Rippetoe:
I'd have a hard time trying to explain to you why an ipsilateral movement with an eight pound chrome dumbbell on an unstable surface would improve the function of the organism. Unless the function of the organism is to produce a unilateral movement, unilateral, ipsilater movement on an unstable surface.

Mark Rippetoe:
I know of no circumstances under which humans do that except in functional training studios. The horrible thing is that most Division 1 and professional strength and conditioning weight rooms have become functional training studios. It's a hell of a thing when the New England Patriots convert their weight room into functional training studio.

Mark Rippetoe:
If you axe me, the idea that functional training makes you stronger is... You have to understand what stronger means, stronger means more force production against an external resistance. And if the force production you're performing against an external resistance is limited by your 10 pound dumbbell, you're not gonna get stronger. If it's limited by the unstable circumstances under which you are attempting to produce that force, you're not going to get any stronger. When you squat 405 and don't fall down when you do it, then not only are you getting stronger when you go up to 410 next time, you're a failing to fall down, therefore you're training balance at the same time.

Mark Rippetoe:
People don't understand that if the instability of the surface is the bottleneck, is the limiting factor in terms of the amount of force you can produce during the training movement, then force production can't be increased. All right. And when you do a squat, when you do 405 and squat all the way down, all the way up and don't fall down, then you you've mastered the balance component. But the balance component is inherent in the movement pattern. It's not the limiting factor in your ability to execute the movement pattern. The ability to produce force is and therefore force production is the trainable variable in that circumstance.

Mark Rippetoe:
And unless force production is the trainable variable that's not limited by instability or some other artificially imposed circumstance, then that thing can't make you stronger. Therefore, functional training is a waste of time. And we've talked about this so many times, it just gets on my nerves and I read about it and I'm sorry I've written about it. And as you talk about something else. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Maximal gains can be made on a vegan diet.

Mark Rippetoe:
You know, I'm I'm on record as having said that veganism is an eating disorder, and I stand firmly by that remark. Veganism is an eating disorder. And within the past year we have seen a lot of athletes who unfortunately were not smart enough to sort this out for themselves go on a vegan diet and lose their careers.

Mark Rippetoe:
As a result, their progress and their performance came to an ass grinding halt because they were improperly recovered from performance and training.

Mark Rippetoe:
Vegan diets. Who's that guy in Canada who bitched and complained about the last time we did this? He did a video about how since I mis-

[off-camera]:
Vegan gains.

Mark Rippetoe:
His primary point was that since I didn't know how to pronounce it correctly, that I didn't know what I was talking about. Oh, it's just so much fun.

[off-camera]:
He was so blinded by rage.

Mark Rippetoe:
He just he was just blinded by rage, but since he was a Canadian, he's very polite about it. So he didn't yell and scream or throw anything around. He merely pointed out the fact that I didn't know how to pronounce veganism correctly.

Mark Rippetoe:
Look, they're VEGetables, so you're a VEGan. OK. You don't get to change the language to suit yourself just to make it sound more exotic or whatever the hell it sounds like when you say veeeeee-gan.

Mark Rippetoe:
It lacks protein. There are a whole bunch of nutrients that are not available in a vegetable diet. Human beings didn't evolve to eat only vegetables. We are not gorillas. There's reasons why the first organized human activity was hunting.

[off-camera]:
Vegans let children die.

Mark Rippetoe:
Children die when they're fed like cattle, you know. Our digestive systems are not capable of subsisting only on vegetables. We're omnivores, we're natural omnivores.

Mark Rippetoe:
And you all know this except the religious people that want to be vegans. And if you all want to be vegans and pretend like you're making maximum gains, you go right ahead. I don't care. It's one of these things I don't care about.

Mark Rippetoe:
But let me let me point out that if you're a vegan, everybody in your family already hates you. All right. And there's a reason for that. Don't go to Thanksgiving. Stay the fuck away from Thanksgiving if you're a vegan. Nobody wants your ass over there. All right. You're a pain in the ass. Nobody wants it to see you make holier than thou comments about not eating the goddamn turkey. Nobody wants you there. Stay home.

Mark Rippetoe:
Here's an interesting thing. All right. We have... Ray put this thing together and I don't know that he understood when he did it he's created an interesting question here. Point one, it's possible to build muscle and lose fat. And point two, gaining weight means increased bodyfat percentage. Like both of these are misconceptions.

Mark Rippetoe:
All right. Here's the deal for a novice. A novice just starting out who's not ever trained before, who is an underweight novice. Let's say he's 5'11, 155. 19 year old kid comes in the first day and he's going to squat 105 pounds for three sets of five for his first squat workout. We going to take that kid up to 105 the first day. And then we're going to take him up to 115, the second workout and then 125, then 135. And then we'll probably slow him down after that to five pound jumps. He'll go to 140, 145, 150 and so on and so forth.

Mark Rippetoe:
And if he eats enough to support his training, then he will gain body weight. And if he starts off at 155, he will end up at one eighty five. After about three months in, his squats will be up in the low 300s. His deadlifts will be up in the mid 300s. He'll be benching maybe two hundred pounds. He'll be pressing 150. This is what we normally expect from a from a kid that's going to eat what he needs to eat in order to recover from the training load.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now that 30 pounds of bodyweight gain is going to be probably 75 percent muscle mass and 25 percent bodyfat because the process of tissue growth is such that you compartment muscle and fat together at the same time. You're going to gain percentages of each one because the processes that build muscle are also processes that cause fat deposition. They require a caloric excess and you cannot - and I know this is popular on the internet - but you cannot partition the process so that you only gain muscle and you don't gain fat. That's not what happens. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
An underweight kid is going to gain a bunch of bodyweight. Three quarters of it will be muscle, which is pretty good. Which means that he went from, you know, 12 percent body fat all the way up to the astonishingly chubby 16 percent body fat. Now, if that bothers you, just go back to, you know, playing video games. So that's what happens to a kid who starts off underweight. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Uh, on the other hand, we might have a kid that comes in. He's 19, right? And he is five eleven and he weighs 275 already. And he hasn't been training. He's a fat kid. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now. A fat kid is anabolic alread. In other words, he's very good at building tissue. And by building tissue, I mean both muscle and fat. Now, this is disturbing to many of you, but the fact of the matter is, if you take a kid that's 19 years old and you put him on the couch for a year and you have him drink Cokes and eat potato chips and he gains a hundred pounds of body weight, that seventy-five pounds of that bodyweight is going to be fat. But twenty five pounds, it's going to be lean body mass. And I know that doesn't seem fair. Nonetheless, that's what happens.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now what we can do for the fat kid with training is we put him on a diet that is adequate to support recovery from his training.

Mark Rippetoe:
And if I've got a hundred and fifty five pound kid, I want him eating 4500-5000 calories a day. I want him drinking a gallon of milk because he's underweight and he needs to grow. I want him to eat a whole bunch of food. 4500-5000 calories a day will make him gain bodyweight, as I've previously described.

Mark Rippetoe:
If I've got this 275 pound kid who's 5'11", 19 years old, I want him to eat fewer calories. And by fewer calories for him, I mean I want him to eat 3000 calories. And in that particular set of circumstances, we have a kid that's already good at gaining weight. He's proved it because he's a fat kid. He knows. His body is comfortable with growing tissue.

Mark Rippetoe:
What's gonna happen with that kid in that particular set of circumstances is that over the 6 or 7 months that we were previously referring to, he's going to lose down to probably 235 on 3000 calories a day. And his lifts are going to go up maybe faster than skinny kid's because he's good at building muscle tissue. Furthermore, he's started off with a higher amount of lean body mass than the skinny kid did. He's already got more muscle to work with. We're gonna see similar improvements in his lifts from a higher baseline level.

Mark Rippetoe:
That kid may well be at 450 deadlift. He may be at a 375 squat. A 275 bench. You know, a 175 press in that same period of time. Because he had more muscle to start with. But that kid is actually losing fat during the same processes taking place as the kid who is skinny, who's going to be gaining fat. And this is the difference in the two individuals. So you have to understand that depending on where you start, different things are going to occur.

Mark Rippetoe:
But most of the time, if you are of normal body composition and you're not fat, if you gain muscular body weight, there's going to be a component of bodyfat increase in that bodyweight gain. You may gain 30 pounds of muscle in the process of doing that. If you gain 10 pounds of fat. That'll be fine. You will actually look better than you did before.

Mark Rippetoe:
And as our friend Robert Santana's pointed out, the most impressive improvements in aesthetic, in aesthetics and appearance to a young male who's beginning to train come from the improvements that are made by the deadlift. Because if your neck grows and your traps grow and your lats get bigger and your shoulders get bigger, you are going to look different in your shirt than you do if all you do is is squat and get bigger legs because what people see when they walk up to you is your upper body.

Mark Rippetoe:
People's eyes are drawn to your face. And if they see your face, they're going to see your neck and your traps and then your appearance goes from the top down. And that's what they see. So the deadlift's very important to this aesthetic change.

Mark Rippetoe:
Anyway, if you gain a little body fat, it's OK. All right. We know how to take body fat off. If it gets excessive, we can do that later. So we have to we have to keep hammering home the idea that a 40... a 40 pound gain in bodyweight is going to have a component of fat to it. But the muscle gain far overshadows the effect that any additional bodyfat may may cause to your aesthetic appearance.

Mark Rippetoe:
Here's a popular misconception: Your doctor is an expert on your body. To the extent that if your doctor tells...gives you exercise advice. Well, he is a doctor. After all, he is a doctor and he knows everything about your body.

Mark Rippetoe:
No, he doesn't.

Mark Rippetoe:
We're going to do a show here pretty soon on the topic "Stupid shit your doctor says." That'll be the title of the program. The stupid shit your doctor says and your doctor says stupid shit. So I'm going to just save that for for that day. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Associated with that is that your chiropractor or your physical therapist have an informed opinion about strength training. No. No, they don't.

Mark Rippetoe:
I don't have an informed opinion about chiropractic. I don't have an informed opinion about physical therapy. Well, yeah, really, I do.

Mark Rippetoe:
But your chiropractic and your physical therapist, just because they work in a health care related field are not experts on strength training. Strength coaches are experts on strength training, not chiropractors and not even all of them. That is certainly true.

Mark Rippetoe:
But the idea that a physical therapist who knows how to massage your hand is an expert in the mechanisms that make your hands stronger is... they're not trained in that. That's not what they're taught to do. It's a completely separate field of endeavor.

Mark Rippetoe:
Certainly chiropractors don't have any idea about this. Now, some chiropractors have gotten used to the idea that strength training helps support a spine. But by and large, neither chiropractors nor physical therapists have the slightest idea about strength training.

Mark Rippetoe:
So don't get them to train you unless you know that they've trained people in... people that they've trained who've gotten stronger. There are some chiropractors and some physical therapists who also are pretty good strength coaches. And I said some of them, but the majority of them are not. And it is a mistake to rely upon their expertise to carry over into a completely separate field of endeavor, just like it is to expect that your orthopedic surgeon, because he's an orthopedic surgeon, can tell you the best way to squat because he doesn't know that he's never studied it. I have. I don't talk about knee surgery. He shouldn't talk about squats.

Mark Rippetoe:
Oh, let's see: Personal trainers know how to make people strong.

Mark Rippetoe:
This is an extension of this previous discussion topic. Personal trainers know how to talk to people between sets on the leg extension. They know how to talk about their kids or their grandkids or whatever their personal circumstances might be to fill up an hour appointment. But unless that personal trainer has produced stronger clients, then that personal trainer does not know anything about strength training.

Mark Rippetoe:
Personal training is a different endeavor entirely. It's not strength coaching. It is essentially babysitting. Personal training is good for people who need outside accountability for their exercise schedule. If you have to go to the gym and meet your personal trainer at 5:30 after work because you have an appointment with a personal trainer and she's waiting on you, then you'll go usually. And if you make your exercise appointment and you burn some calories and get hot, sweaty and tired, that's probably better than just going straight home.

Mark Rippetoe:
But there is one way to to determine whether or not your personal trainer knows anything about strength training: Is your personal trainer making you stronger? And by stronger, I mean, do the weights on the bars go up. Qhen you, during the period of time you've been training with that personal trainer - are you stronger? Are you lifting heavier weights? If you are, then that personal trainer either knows something about making you stronger or you're a rank novice and you were going to get stronger just because you're doing something you weren't doing previously.

Mark Rippetoe:
But the fact that they are personal trainers, the fact it says trainer on their shirt in the Globo gym does not mean they know the first thing whatsoever about anything other than how to operate the exercise machines. That's all they may well know about. If they've taken it upon themselves to learn their trade effectively, then they may well know something. But you can have a job in a place like that and not know a damn thing. A lot of them do. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Let's see what else is interesting: Some people don't have the genetics to get strong.

Mark Rippetoe:
Well, you know, that's certainly true if by strong you mean operate at the highest levels of powerlifting, weightlifting, the throwing sports stuff that depends on on barbell strength training for its success at the elite levels of the sport. But that's not really the question here. The question is some people don't have the genetics to get strong. And what that really should mean is stronger. Everybody, by virtue of the fact that they are still alive, has the ability to get stronger than they are now.

Mark Rippetoe:
How much stronger is a different topic entirely now. Little skinny people with a preponderance of slow twitch muscles probably need to be runners, but most people don't have that muscle fiber type skew. Most people can get a whole lot stronger than they are right now, and therefore it is silly to say that some people don't have the genetics to get strong. Strong is relative. If you're squatting ninety five right now and I take your squat up to 200, you've gotten strong, haven't you? And if you don't do that, then, yeah, you're going to stay weak.

Mark Rippetoe:
But the fact of the matter is, is that your genetic machinery is in place to enable you to grow muscle mass and to make more strength out of the muscles. It's just sitting there waiting on you to develop it. And if you're alive, those genetics, quote unquote, are in operation and you can, in fact, get stronger and you should get stronger.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, you might not want to. And the idea that you can't might be a wonderful excuse to not try, but that's all that is, is an excuse. And let's call it an excuse because that's what it is.

Mark Rippetoe:
Some of these things are just not - down here at the end of the list: getting too strong will slow you down.

Mark Rippetoe:
That only makes sense to somebody who thinks that running faster or or going faster on the bike or doing something that you know can be measured in terms of velocity is not a force production event. When you run faster do you produce more force between you're body's mass on the ground? If the answer to that is yes, then getting stronger is going to make you faster.

Mark Rippetoe:
Now, getting stronger... the straw man there would be that well, you know, you don't want to take a hundred and thirty pound marathon athlete and make him into a two hundred and twenty pound power lifter. Surely that will slow you down.

Mark Rippetoe:
That's what we call a straw man argument. We didn't say we want to double his bodyweight. We just want to make him stronger. He's not squatting anything right now. We get to squat up to ninety five pounds. You think that's going go slow him down? Come on. Let's not be dumb here. All right, then. We don't have time for dumb. All right.

Mark Rippetoe:
Getting strong will ruin your cardio.

Mark Rippetoe:
Ruin your cardio? What mechanism would be at place, in place, that would provide for the destruction of your cardiovascular capacity by getting your squat up from nothing to 135?

Mark Rippetoe:
Ruin your cardio? What does that even mean? You see this mindless nonsense in the media, in the magazines, on the internet, on the network news from the BBC, on NPR. Wonderful places like this.

Mark Rippetoe:
As with most things, most of these misconceptions we've been dealing with here today are the fault of the media. The media are dishonest cowards. They are interested in selling clicks, selling advertising. And if they have to play you for a fool to do it, I assure you they will. And they have in any of these misconceptions that you have heard today that actually kinda is something you believe is the result of the media having played you for a fool. Right?

Mark Rippetoe:
Look this stuff up for yourself. The lesson here is these misconceptions get placed in your little brain for a reason. It's not just because you're not informed. It's because somebody wants you misinformed. Now, who might that be? Okay. Ask yourself that next time you go through these things or next time you see something in the in the in a magazine at the newsstand or on the internet or on the six o'clock news, that makes absolutely no sense.

Mark Rippetoe:
But it sounds like well you know, I mean here it is on the news. I can't say it if it's not true. You know, they they can and they did. And they have. And you might have believed it. Check that out for yourself. All right. Something you said makes no sense whatsoever.

Mark Rippetoe:
Or it's it's sounds silly superficially. Ask somebody about it and let us help you. You can ask us StartingStrength.com. We have a large forum where you can interact with us. And lot of other experts. We have lots and lots of medical people that read those boards and will post in response to your questions.

Mark Rippetoe:
And we can we can enlighten you on some of this stuff. If you'll read our books, a lot of this is in there. The mechanisms by which your body operate are not terribly complicated, but they require more than just a sixth grade education. And it's your responsibility to obtain that. So ask us there. Check with us if you're confused about anything. Don't just blindly believe what your doctor says. Your doctor is not an authority on this.

Mark Rippetoe:
If your doctor tells you you have cancer, your doctor might be right about that. But if your doctor tells you that cancer patients can't train for strength, that's the kind of bad advice that gets people dead. There's is a good example of one thing in particular.

Mark Rippetoe:
Don't listen to everything somebody tells you under color of color of authority, because authority is not always the final word in this situation.

Mark Rippetoe:
So thanks for joining us again today on Starting Strength Radio. We've addressed several misconceptions. If you've got any other questions you'd like answered, next time we put up a link on our SpeakUp channel about about questions for a Q&A, put them there and we'll get to them just as soon as we can.

Mark Rippetoe:
Thank you for joining us. And we'll see you next time.

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Mark Rippetoe refutes common misconceptions and conventional wisdom when it comes to strength training and Starting Strength.

  • 00:00 Introduction
  • 01:07 Comments from the Haters!
  • 05:36 R@y G!LL!^Ch33z3r & today's topic: Common Misconceptions
  • 06:35 Run to lose bodyfat
  • 11:28 Lifting causes high blood pressure
  • 13:56 Train more often, train more exercises to make faster progress
  • 18:29 A variety of exercises are needed to make sure every body part is trained
  • 24:02 Eat keto or Paleo to stay lean
  • 28:17 Lifting causes women to get bulky
  • 31:48 Toning
  • 43:13 Yoga is important to stay loose and flexible
  • 47:32 Functional training makes you stronger
  • 52:11 Maximal gains can be made on a vegan diet
  • 55:26 Building muscle, gaining weight, bodyfat
  • 01:04:39 Your doctor is an expert on your body
  • 01:07:40 Personal trainers know how to make people strong
  • 01:10:23 Some people don't have the genetics to get strong
  • 01:13:03 Getting too strong will slow you down
  • 01:14:22 Getting strong will ruin your cardio

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